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South Auckland > Eye Care Providers >

Visique Botany Optometrists

Optometry Service

Today

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

Description

Congratulations on choosing Visique Botany Optometrists! We take Eyes Seriously...

Optometrist, David Lee, welcomes new and existing customers to come and visit the team at our new Visique Botany store!

We offer the latest in eye care technology and take great pride in offering only the best in customer care!

So come and meet the team at Visique Botany Optometrists on the corner of Te Irirangi Drive and Bishop Dunn Place in Botany; centrally located opposite Mitre 10 and Sancta Maria College.

Visique Botany Optometrists - We take eyes seriously!

Optometrists

Hours

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

Mon – Fri 8:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Sat 9:00 AM – 5:30 PM

24th December -8:30am to 12:00pm We will close on 25th December 2022 to 3rd January 2023 and we will be back on 4th January 2023 .

Public Holidays: Closed Labour Day (28 Oct), Waitangi Day (6 Feb), Good Friday (18 Apr), Easter Sunday (20 Apr), Easter Monday (21 Apr), ANZAC Day (25 Apr), King's Birthday (2 Jun), Matariki (20 Jun).

Languages Spoken

Bahasa Melayu, Cantonese Chinese, Chinese, English, Indonesian, Korean, Mandarin Chinese, Taiwanese

Services Provided

Vision Testing (acuity, refraction errors and field of vision tests)

During an eye test you are assessed for different things. A Snellen chart, which contains rows of letters starting with one huge letter then groups of letters getting progressively smaller, is used for visual acuity. An optometrist will establish how well you see without spectacles or contact lenses by getting you to read letters until they are too small or blurred to be recognised. They test each eye on its own and both together. Then the test is repeated while wearing your existing eye wear, this is known as your best corrected vision. Then the optometrist will ask you to remove your eye wear again and will see if your ability to read letters can be improved using lenses of different strengths for each eye until your eye sight is as good as it can be. If these new lenses are a different strength from your current spectacles you are given a new prescription and new lenses will be made for you. People usually wear spectacles to correct a refraction error. In these cases the person’s eye lens is incorrectly focused, making that person either long or short sighted. This fault is corrected by placing an external lens, spectacle lens or contact lens, in front of the eye so that what is seen reaches the correct area on the retina in the back of the eye. There are other tests to look for other conditions, so an optometrist can find a corrective lens that gets a person’s sight near to, or in excess of, 20/20 vision. We use central vision to read and look at thing in front of us. We also need side or peripheral vision to see things that are above and below and to the sides. This is also assessed during an eye test as you need a good field of vision to drive a car and it is a requirement for certain professions like the police.

During an eye test you are assessed for different things. A Snellen chart, which contains rows of letters starting with one huge letter then groups of letters getting progressively smaller, is used for visual acuity. An optometrist will establish how well you see without spectacles or contact lenses by getting you to read letters until they are too small or blurred to be recognised. They test each eye on its own and both together. Then the test is repeated while wearing your existing eye wear, this is known as your best corrected vision. Then the optometrist will ask you to remove your eye wear again and will see if your ability to read letters can be improved using lenses of different strengths for each eye until your eye sight is as good as it can be. If these new lenses are a different strength from your current spectacles you are given a new prescription and new lenses will be made for you.

People usually wear spectacles to correct a refraction error. In these cases the person’s eye lens is incorrectly focused, making that person either long or short sighted. This fault is corrected by placing an external lens, spectacle lens or contact lens, in front of the eye so that what is seen reaches the correct area on the retina in the back of the eye. There are other tests to look for other conditions, so an optometrist can find a corrective lens that gets a person’s sight near to, or in excess of, 20/20 vision.

We use central vision to read and look at thing in front of us. We also need side or peripheral vision to see things that are above and below and to the sides. This is also assessed during an eye test as you need a good field of vision to drive a car and it is a requirement for certain professions like the police.

Retinal & Fundus Photography

During an eye test optometrists routinely take a photograph of the back of each of your eyes. These images are transferred to a computer and are filed in your electronic notes. The photos do not show the optometrist anything they will not have seen when inspecting your eye but provide a record that can be referred to at a later date. This is an effective way of monitoring any changes.

During an eye test optometrists routinely take a photograph of the back of each of your eyes. These images are transferred to a computer and are filed in your electronic notes. The photos do not show the optometrist anything they will not have seen when inspecting your eye but provide a record that can be referred to at a later date. This is an effective way of monitoring any changes.

Glaucoma Screening

Optometrists are able to detect early signs of glaucoma even before you are aware of any symptoms. They are specifically looking for changes when doing the health check part of an eye test. Since the optic nerve can be affected by this condition, they will inspect the nerve head in each eye to see if the disc shape has changed and if there are any variations in colour. If picked up early, damage from this condition can be prevented from becoming serious and sight threatening.

Optometrists are able to detect early signs of glaucoma even before you are aware of any symptoms. They are specifically looking for changes when doing the health check part of an eye test. Since the optic nerve can be affected by this condition, they will inspect the nerve head in each eye to see if the disc shape has changed and if there are any variations in colour. If picked up early, damage from this condition can be prevented from becoming serious and sight threatening.

Visual Field Testing

A visual field establishes how good your peripheral vision (PV) is. This is what you see above and below and to the side when you are looking straight ahead. Generally your PV will not be as good as what is known as your central vision but it is important for driving and a good visual field is required to become a New Zealand police officer. There are many conditions that can affect your PV including high blood pressure, glaucoma, strokes, an overactive thyroid, and diabetes. In glaucoma, nerve cells in the retina are damaged and die so messages are unable to be transmitted to the brain. Remarkably up to 40% of these cells can be lost before a person becomes aware of reduced vision.

A visual field establishes how good your peripheral vision (PV) is. This is what you see above and below and to the side when you are looking straight ahead. Generally your PV will not be as good as what is known as your central vision but it is important for driving and a good visual field is required to become a New Zealand police officer. There are many conditions that can affect your PV including high blood pressure, glaucoma, strokes, an overactive thyroid, and diabetes. In glaucoma, nerve cells in the retina are damaged and die so messages are unable to be transmitted to the brain. Remarkably up to 40% of these cells can be lost before a person becomes aware of reduced vision.

Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) can be detected by systematic retinal screening. Diabetes retinal screening is funded by the DHB and some optometrists are contracted to provide the service in the community. Currently this community service is only available in the Greater Wellington Regional Area, Lakes District Health Board (DHB), Tairawhiti DHB, and Counties Manukau DHB. The aim of the service is to ensure each individual diagnosed with diabetes has received a retinal screen during the preceding 24 months and that their data is transferred to the primary care provider they are enrolled with, and DHB. Entry to this free service is by referral from your general practitioner (GP), who will know which optometrists are able to provide systematic retinal screening. If diabetic eye disease is detected by your regular optometrist, they will refer you to your GP for diabetes management. This will include regular systematic retinal screening. The majority of patients who have had diabetes for more than a decade will show signs of damage. Early detection helps as patients can be advised on changes to their diet and lifestyle to control blood sugar levels and minimise damage caused to this vital organ.

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) can be detected by systematic retinal screening. Diabetes retinal screening is funded by the DHB and some optometrists are contracted to provide the service in the community. Currently this community service is only available in the Greater Wellington Regional Area, Lakes District Health Board (DHB), Tairāwhiti DHB, and Counties Manukau DHB. The aim of the service is to ensure each individual diagnosed with diabetes has received a retinal screen during the preceding 24 months and that their data is transferred to the primary care provider they are enrolled with, and DHB. Entry to this free service is by referral from your general practitioner (GP), who will know which optometrists are able to provide systematic retinal screening.

If diabetic eye disease is detected by your regular optometrist, they will refer you to your GP for diabetes management. This will include regular systematic retinal screening. The majority of patients who have had diabetes for more than a decade will show signs of damage. Early detection helps as patients can be advised on changes to their diet and lifestyle to control blood sugar levels and minimise damage caused to this vital organ.

Eye Injuries

Eye injuries can range from relatively minor, for instance getting dish washing liquid in your eye, to penetrating injuries with a sharp object like scissors leading to blindness. Optometrists deal with superficial eye injuries. These are eye injuries that take 24-72 hours to heal. Eye injuries can be treated with eye drops to prevent infection and oral analgesia (painkillers) to treat pain. Optometrists will refer people with more serious eye injuries to ophthalmologists.

Eye injuries can range from relatively minor, for instance getting dish washing liquid in your eye, to penetrating injuries with a sharp object like scissors leading to blindness. Optometrists deal with superficial eye injuries. These are eye injuries that take 24-72 hours to heal. Eye injuries can be treated with eye drops to prevent infection and oral analgesia (painkillers) to treat pain. Optometrists will refer people with more serious eye injuries to ophthalmologists.

Children’s Vision Testing

It is vital children have their eyes tested early to screen for abnormalities. If there are problems like strabismus, where eyes are misaligned, or amblyopia, commonly called a lazy eye, the earlier treatment starts the better the outcome. Poor eyesight will also reduce a child’s ability to learn at home as well as at school. As well as testing for these conditions optometrists test for near and far vision; if needed, corrective glasses will make a great difference to a child’s ability to see and interact with the world. Children are also tested for colour blindness.

It is vital children have their eyes tested early to screen for abnormalities. If there are problems like strabismus, where eyes are misaligned, or amblyopia, commonly called a lazy eye, the earlier treatment starts the better the outcome. Poor eyesight will also reduce a child’s ability to learn at home as well as at school. As well as testing for these conditions optometrists test for near and far vision; if needed, corrective glasses will make a great difference to a child’s ability to see and interact with the world. Children are also tested for colour blindness.

Occupational Testing

Anyone wishing to join the New Zealand Police needs to pass a special eye test conducted by a registered practitioner. Potential police officers are tested for unaided sight and they are also required to have good peripheral and night vision. Their eyes must look normal. Anyone with a squint is rejected. There is also specialist testing for civil aviation and test pilots. There are maritime visual exams for people in the fishing industry.

Anyone wishing to join the New Zealand Police needs to pass a special eye test conducted by a registered practitioner. Potential police officers are tested for unaided sight and they are also required to have good peripheral and night vision. Their eyes must look normal. Anyone with a squint is rejected. There is also specialist testing for civil aviation and test pilots. There are maritime visual exams for people in the fishing industry.

Drivers Licence Testing

This includes testing for visual field as you need to meet a certain standard to be able to drive safely. There is a screening tool and a full test. The full test is given to borderline cases to ensure that drivers meet the required standards.

This includes testing for visual field as you need to meet a certain standard to be able to drive safely. There is a screening tool and a full test. The full test is given to borderline cases to ensure that drivers meet the required standards.

Eyewear

Frames: there is a baffling range of spectacle frames available in most optical outlets. They are made in many shapes, sizes, colours and materials. They are also made for different uses, reflecting the lifestyle and work of individual wearers. Dispensing opticians and optometrists are able to help you find a frame that complements the shape of your face, colouring and suits your needs. They will also take a set of measurements to ensure that the frame built for you fits correctly and that you get maximum use from the lenses. Lenses: at the end of an eye test, if your vision can be improved by wearing glasses, the optometrist will write a prescription for a set of lenses. In some cases you will have a different prescription for each eye. Lenses are designed to bring your eyesight up to 20/20 vision and middle aged and older patients may be advised to have varifocals so that they do not require a second pair of glasses for reading or close work. Lens technology is improving all the time with new lightweight material becoming available that can self adjust to reduce light. Contact lenses: contact lenses have been around for more than half a century. The material has changed over this period: hard or soft lenses being replaced by gas permeable and now disposable contact lenses. These lenses are able to compensate for long or short sight and are worn for a day then thrown away to minimise the risk of infecting the eye. Because a foreign object is placed on the eye, contact lens users are advised to have an annual eye check so that an optometrist can check the cornea to ensure there are no abrasions or other long term complications. While most wearers use contact lenses to improve their eyesight there are products that can change the colour of your eyes or make them a darker or lighter shade of the same colour. Sunglasses: your dispensing optician and optometrist will be able to advise you on the most suitable sunglasses to lessen damage caused by ultraviolet light. Choosing: dispensing opticians and optometrists are trained to help you select spectacle frames and lenses that suit your look, lifestyle and pocket. They will ask about your work, interests and preferences and then find you a selection of models to consider. They are aware of a set of principles that help them find frames they think will suit the shape of your face and colouring. The final choice is yours. Care of glasses/lenses: as part of the service offered by dispensing opticians and optometrists, patients are given advice and tips about how to look after their spectacles. Things that will extend the working lives of eyewear like using both hands to take off or put them on, correct storage, best methods of cleaning and so forth. In the past they will also have advised contact lens wearers on the best way to sterilise these objects but most wearers today use disposable contact lenses so this is no longer necessary. Adjusting: wear and tear during everyday use means that arm hinges become loose and the frame is bent out of shape. Your dispensing optician or optometrist will usually readjust the glasses he has sold you free of charge. Warranty: generally your spectacle frames will have a manufacturer’s one or two year warranty which will cover things like faulty soldering or arm hinges. It does not cover damage done if your specs are chewed by a dog or they are run over by a car. Lenses also have a one or two year warranty. Repair: dispensing opticians and optometrists not only help you find the most suitable pair of glasses but are also able to repair them. Most commonly, arms get loose when they are pushed to the top of the head and need tightening up, nose pads break off and spectacles become bent when they are sat on. Many of these repairs can be done in the workshop most dispensing opticians have behind the shop or, when parts are broken, new components can be ordered in to replace the damaged part.

Frames: there is a baffling range of spectacle frames available in most optical outlets. They are made in many shapes, sizes, colours and materials. They are also made for different uses, reflecting the lifestyle and work of individual wearers. Dispensing opticians and optometrists are able to help you find a frame that complements the shape of your face, colouring and suits your needs. They will also take a set of measurements to ensure that the frame built for you fits correctly and that you get maximum use from the lenses.

Lenses: at the end of an eye test, if your vision can be improved by wearing glasses, the optometrist will write a prescription for a set of lenses. In some cases you will have a different prescription for each eye. Lenses are designed to bring your eyesight up to 20/20 vision and middle aged and older patients may be advised to have varifocals so that they do not require a second pair of glasses for reading or close work. Lens technology is improving all the time with new lightweight material becoming available that can self adjust to reduce light.

Contact lenses: contact lenses have been around for more than half a century. The material has changed over this period: hard or soft lenses being replaced by gas permeable and now disposable contact lenses. These lenses are able to compensate for long or short sight and are worn for a day then thrown away to minimise the risk of infecting the eye. Because a foreign object is placed on the eye, contact lens users are advised to have an annual eye check so that an optometrist can check the cornea to ensure there are no abrasions or other long term complications. While most wearers use contact lenses to improve their eyesight there are products that can change the colour of your eyes or make them a darker or lighter shade of the same colour.

Sunglasses: your dispensing optician and optometrist will be able to advise you on the most suitable sunglasses to lessen damage caused by ultraviolet light.

Choosing: dispensing opticians and optometrists are trained to help you select spectacle frames and lenses that suit your look, lifestyle and pocket. They will ask about your work, interests and preferences and then find you a selection of models to consider. They are aware of a set of principles that help them find frames they think will suit the shape of your face and colouring. The final choice is yours.

Care of glasses/lenses: as part of the service offered by dispensing opticians and optometrists, patients are given advice and tips about how to look after their spectacles. Things that will extend the working lives of eyewear like using both hands to take off or put them on, correct storage, best methods of cleaning and so forth. In the past they will also have advised contact lens wearers on the best way to sterilise these objects but most wearers today use disposable contact lenses so this is no longer necessary.

Adjusting: wear and tear during everyday use means that arm hinges become loose and the frame is bent out of shape. Your dispensing optician or optometrist will usually readjust the glasses he has sold you free of charge.

Warranty: generally your spectacle frames will have a manufacturer’s one or two year warranty which will cover things like faulty soldering or arm hinges. It does not cover damage done if your specs are chewed by a dog or they are run over by a car. Lenses also have a one or two year warranty.

Repair: dispensing opticians and optometrists not only help you find the most suitable pair of glasses but are also able to repair them. Most commonly, arms get loose when they are pushed to the top of the head and need tightening up, nose pads break off and spectacles become bent when they are sat on. Many of these repairs can be done in the workshop most dispensing opticians have behind the shop or, when parts are broken, new components can be ordered in to replace the damaged part.

Eye Health Examinations

During an eye test optometrists routinely examine the internal and external structures of your eye. The optometrist will look into your eye by shining a light source through your pupil to illuminate the retina. This may take some time as the optometrist will want to ensure the fundus is viewed as completely as possible and all signs and symptoms of eye disease are noted. It is important that the causes of poor vision are determined before any treatment, including spectacles, is prescribed.

During an eye test optometrists routinely examine the internal and external structures of your eye. The optometrist will look into your eye by shining a light source through your pupil to illuminate the retina. This may take some time as the optometrist will want to ensure the fundus is viewed as completely as possible and all signs and symptoms of eye disease are noted. It is important that the causes of poor vision are determined before any treatment, including spectacles, is prescribed.

Our Guarantee

Have you recently purchased spectacles from Visique Botany Optometrists? If "yes" then we are confident that you will be happy with your new spectacles and how they wear. That is why all our spectacles are sold with a 60-day peace of mind guarantee. If there is any aspect of your spectacles with which you are not satisfied, please let us know. Your spectacles also have a twelve month warranty to cover manufacturing faults. If your frame breaks under normal wearing conditions we will repair it or replace it under warranty. Your lenses have been treated to offer the hardest, most durable surface protection available. Please follow our recommended procedures for cleaning. If your lenses are scratched or broken within the first 12 months, under normal wearing conditions, we will replace them once with the same prescription. This warranty does not cover loss, theft, or hairline scratches, which have no effect on vision.

Have you recently purchased spectacles from Visique Botany Optometrists?

If "yes" then we are confident that you will be happy with your new spectacles and how they wear.

That is why all our spectacles are sold with a 60-day peace of mind guarantee.
If there is any aspect of your spectacles with which you are not satisfied, please let us know.

Your spectacles also have a twelve month warranty to cover manufacturing faults.

If your frame breaks under normal wearing conditions we will repair it or replace it under warranty.

Your lenses have been treated to offer the hardest, most durable surface protection available. Please follow our recommended procedures for cleaning.

If your lenses are scratched or broken within the first 12 months, under normal wearing conditions, we will replace them once with the same prescription.

This warranty does not cover loss, theft, or hairline scratches, which have no effect on vision.
 

Myopia Control

Myopia Control at Visique Botany At Visique Botany, we care about your eye health. What is myopia? Myopia, more commonly known as short-sightedness, is a very common eye condition where objects need to be brought in closer for them to be seen clearly. The alarming increase of myopia is a growing concern all over the world, with onset being predominantly in the younger population. Those who start being short-sighted as children are more likely to have their myopia progress, and it will usually continue to progress until they reach the ages of 18-25. Why is myopia a concern? Being short-sighted isn’t just about the burden of wearing spectacles or contact lenses – with the progression of short-sightedness, the length of the eye can grow longer than its inner components can tolerate. This leads to an increased risk of blinding eye conditions such as retinal detachments, macular maculopathy and choroidal retinoschisis. Therefore it is especially important for those with high myopia to attend the regular comprehensive eye health examinations that we offer. What increases the risk and/or progression of myopia? Genetics – children with myopic parents are more likely to develop myopia. Lack of outdoor activity – studies show that lack of outdoor activity regardless of the amount of indoor activity is a big driving factor towards the onset of myopia. Ethnicity – there appears to be a higher prevalence of myopia in Asian children. Eye alignment – young eyes that tend to converge too much at near are more likely to develop myopia. What can Visique Botany do to help control my child’s myopia? At Visique Botany, we have 4 options for our patients to control myopia: Orthokeratology Contact Lenses · A rigid, gas permeable contact lens worn during night time when sleeping. · These contact lenses mould the shape of the cornea during sleep to change the power of the eye, giving clear vision during the day (no glasses or contact lenses during the day!). · This is our most popular option at Visique Botany. Atropine Eye Drops · Eye drops instilled before sleeping that, with our current understanding, signal the back of the eye to stop growing excessively. · Atropine must be used in combination with some form of vision correction. Myopia Control Spectacle Lenses · Myopia control spectacles must be worn every day for the intervention to be effective. · Myopia control spectacles can control myopia by steepening the retinal image shell to signal the back of the eye to stop growing excessively. · Myopia control spectacles can also have a ‘relaxation zone’ at the bottom of the lens to help the eye muscles to relax when doing near work. · At Visique Botany, we have three different myopia control lenses: A) Carl Zeiss Myovision B) Essilor Myopilux Max C) Essilor Myopilux Pro Combination Treatment Patients may also choose to combine two different interventions for more effective myopia control: · Atropine + Ortho K · Atropine + Myovision/ Myopilux Please feel free to call us on 09 274 9839 to speak with one of our lovely staff for more information.

Myopia Control at Visique Botany

At Visique Botany, we care about your eye health.

What is myopia?
Myopia, more commonly known as short-sightedness, is a very common eye condition where objects need to be brought in closer for them to be seen clearly.

The alarming increase of myopia is a growing concern all over the world, with onset being predominantly in the younger population. Those who start being short-sighted as children are more likely to have their myopia progress, and it will usually continue to progress until they reach the ages of 18-25.

Why is myopia a concern?
Being short-sighted isn’t just about the burden of wearing spectacles or contact lenses – with the progression of short-sightedness, the length of the eye can grow longer than its inner components can tolerate. This leads to an increased risk of blinding eye conditions such as retinal detachments, macular maculopathy and choroidal retinoschisis.

Therefore it is especially important for those with high myopia to attend the regular comprehensive eye health examinations that we offer.

What increases the risk and/or progression of myopia?

  • Genetics – children with myopic parents are more likely to develop myopia.
  • Lack of outdoor activity – studies show that lack of outdoor activity regardless of the amount of indoor activity is a big driving factor towards the onset of myopia.
  • Ethnicity – there appears to be a higher prevalence of myopia in Asian children.
  • Eye alignment – young eyes that tend to converge too much at near are more likely to develop myopia.

What can Visique Botany do to help control my child’s myopia?

At Visique Botany, we have 4 options for our patients to control myopia:

  1. Orthokeratology Contact Lenses
    ·  A rigid, gas permeable contact lens worn during night time when sleeping.
    ·  These contact lenses mould the shape of the cornea during sleep to change the power of the eye, giving clear vision during the day (no glasses or contact lenses during the day!).
    ·  This is our most popular option at Visique Botany.

  2. Atropine Eye Drops
    ·  Eye drops instilled before sleeping that, with our current understanding, signal the back of the eye to stop growing excessively.
    ·  Atropine must be used in combination with some form of vision correction.

  3. Myopia Control Spectacle Lenses
    ·  Myopia control spectacles must be worn every day for the intervention to be effective.
    ·  Myopia control spectacles can control myopia by steepening the retinal image shell to signal the back of the eye to stop growing excessively.
    ·  Myopia control spectacles can also have a ‘relaxation zone’ at the bottom of the lens to help the eye muscles to relax when doing near work.
    ·  At Visique Botany, we have three different myopia control lenses:
    A)    Carl Zeiss Myovision
    B)    Essilor Myopilux Max
    C)    Essilor Myopilux Pro

  4. Combination Treatment
    Patients may also choose to combine two different interventions for more effective myopia control:
    ·  Atropine + Ortho K
    ·  Atropine + Myovision/ Myopilux


Please feel free to call us on 09 274 9839 to speak with one of our lovely staff for more information.

Contact Details

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

We welcome any enquiries you may have. Feel free to telephone us or, alternatively, email us.

Use our online contact form

11/2 Bishop Dunn Place
Bishop Gate Business Centre
Flat Bush
Auckland 2013

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Street Address

11/2 Bishop Dunn Place
Bishop Gate Business Centre
Flat Bush
Auckland 2013

Postal Address

11/2 Bishop Dunn Place
Bishop Gate's Business Centre
Flat Bush
Auckland

This page was last updated at 12:57PM on December 6, 2023. This information is reviewed and edited by Visique Botany Optometrists.