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Bay Surgery - Daniel Mafi: General, Upper GI & Bariatric Surgeon

Private Service, General Surgery, Bariatric (Weight Loss) Surgery

In the event of an emergency Dr Daniel Mafi can be contacted on 02102500869.

Today

Description

Daniel Mafi is a General, Laparoscopic and Endoscopic Surgeon with a special interest in weight loss surgery, hernia repairs, and oesophageal and gastric problems including anti-reflux procedures.

Daniel has gained a wealth of experience over the past 15 years, working in all of New Zealand’s major centers, covering the full breadth of surgical specialties, including four years of Plastic and Reconstructive surgery. 

He also spent two years of subspecialty training at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary (Scotland) where he held the prestigious International Medical Training Fellowship in Oesophago-gastric Surgery. Having worked at the busiest cancer center in Scotland with internationally recognised experts, Daniel has returned to New Zealand with a comprehensive set-of-skills and truly contemporary expertise in managing Upper gastrointestinal disorders.  Additional experience was gained during this time in complex hernia surgery (including abdominal wall reconstruction) and bariatric (weight loss) surgery.

Daniel is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and member of the New Zealand Association of General Surgeons.  He holds Consultant positions at Tauranga Hospital (Bay of Plenty DHB) and Grace Hospital (Norfolk Southern Cross Ltd).

 
What is General Surgery?
The role of the general surgeon varies, but in broad terms general surgery can be said to deal with a wide range of conditions within the abdomen, breast, neck, skin and, in many cases, vascular (blood vessel) system.
 
While the name would suggest that the focus of general surgery is to perform operations, often this is not the case. Many patients are referred to surgeons with conditions that do not need surgical procedures, but merely require counselling or medical treatment.
 
What is Bariatric Surgery?
Bariatric or weight loss surgery is a term that covers all the different surgical procedures used to help overweight or morbidly obese patients lose weight.

Morbidly obese patients are usually identified by their Body Mass Index (BMI) measurement, although other factors are often also taken into account. Morbid obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing illnesses such as: heart attack, hypertension, stroke, diabetes, sleep disorders and joint pain. Bariatric surgery can cure or greatly improve these illnesses as well as give the patient an improved quality of life.

Consultants

How do I access this service?

Referral, Contact us, Make an appointment

Referral Expectations

When you come to your appointment, your surgeon will ask questions about your illness and examine you to try to determine or confirm the diagnosis. This process may also require a number of tests (e.g. blood tests, x-rays, scans etc). Sometimes this can all be done during one visit, but for some conditions this will take several follow-up appointments. Occasionally some tests are arranged even before your appointment to try to speed up the process.
 
Once a diagnosis has been made, your surgeon will discuss treatment with you. In some instances this will mean surgery, while other cases can be managed with medication and advice. If surgery is advised, the steps involved in the surgical process and the likely outcome are usually discussed with you at this time.

Charges

Daniel is a Southern Cross Affiliated Provider for General Surgery, Bariatric and Skin services. Contact us for more information about your insurance claim 

Hours

Mon – Fri 6:30 AM – 6:30 PM

Languages Spoken

English, Tongan

Procedures / Treatments

Gastroscopy

This is a procedure which allows the doctor to see inside your oesophagus, stomach, and the first part of the small intestine (duodenum) and examine the lining directly. What to expect The gastroscope is a plastic-coated tube about as thick as a ballpoint pen and is flexible. It has a tiny camera attached that sends images to a viewing screen. During the test you will swallow the tube but the back of your throat is sprayed with anaesthetic so you don’t feel this. You will be offered a sedative (medicine that will make you sleepy but is not a general anaesthetic) as well. If the doctor sees any abnormalities they can take a biopsy (a small piece of tissue) to send to the laboratory for testing. This is not a painful procedure and will be performed at the day stay unit in a theatre suite (operating room) by a specialist doctor with nurses assisting. Complications from this procedure are very rare but can occur. They include: bleeding after a biopsy, if performed an allergic reaction to the sedative or throat spray perforation (tearing) of the stomach with the instrument (this is a serious but extremely rare complication). Before the procedure You will be asked not to eat anything from midnight the night before and not to take any of your medications on the day of the procedure. After the procedure You will stay in the day stay unit until the sedation has worn off which usually takes 1-2 hours. You will be given something to eat or drink before you go home. If you have been sedated, you are not to drive until the following day. If biopsies are taken these will be sent for analysis and results are available within 2-3 weeks. A report and copies of these are sent to your GP.

This is a procedure which allows the doctor to see inside your oesophagus, stomach, and the first part of the small intestine (duodenum) and examine the lining directly. 

What to expect
The gastroscope is a plastic-coated tube about as thick as a ballpoint pen and is flexible.  It has a tiny camera attached that sends images to a viewing screen.  During the test you will swallow the tube but the back of your throat is sprayed with anaesthetic so you don’t feel this.  You will be offered a sedative (medicine that will make you sleepy but is not a general anaesthetic) as well.  If the doctor sees any abnormalities they can take a biopsy (a small piece of tissue) to send to the laboratory for testing. 

This is not a painful procedure and will be performed at the day stay unit in a theatre suite (operating room) by a specialist doctor with nurses assisting.

Complications from this procedure are very rare but can occur. They include:

  • bleeding after a biopsy, if performed
  • an allergic reaction to the sedative or throat spray
  • perforation (tearing) of the stomach with the instrument (this is a serious but extremely rare complication).

Before the procedure
You will be asked not to eat anything from midnight the night before and not to take any of your medications on the day of the procedure.

After the procedure
You will stay in the day stay unit until the sedation has worn off which usually takes 1-2 hours.  You will be given something to eat or drink before you go home.  If you have been sedated, you are not to drive until the following day.

If biopsies are taken these will be sent for analysis and results are available within 2-3 weeks.  A report and copies of these are sent to your GP.

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Conditions of the gut dealt with by general surgery include disorders of the oesophagus, stomach, small bowel, large bowel and anus. These range from complex conditions such as ulceration or cancer in the bowel through to fairly minor conditions such as haemorrhoids. Many of the more major conditions such as bowel cancer will require surgery, or sometimes treatment with medication, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Haemorrhoids are a condition where the veins under the lining of the anus are congested and enlarged. Less severe haemorrhoids can be managed with simple treatments such as injection or banding which can be performed in the clinic while larger ones will require surgery.

Conditions of the gut dealt with by general surgery include disorders of the oesophagus, stomach, small bowel, large bowel and anus. These range from complex conditions such as ulceration or cancer in the bowel through to fairly minor conditions such as haemorrhoids. Many of the more major conditions such as bowel cancer will require surgery, or sometimes treatment with medication, chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

Haemorrhoids are a condition where the veins under the lining of the anus are congested and enlarged. Less severe haemorrhoids can be managed with simple treatments such as injection or banding which can be performed in the clinic while larger ones will require surgery.
Gallstones

General surgery covers some disorders of the liver and biliary system. The most common of these is pain caused by gallstones. These are formed if the gallbladder is not working properly, and the standard treatment is to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy). This procedure is usually performed using a laparoscopic (keyhole) approach.

General surgery covers some disorders of the liver and biliary system. The most common of these is pain caused by gallstones. These are formed if the gallbladder is not working properly, and the standard treatment is to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy). This procedure is usually performed using a laparoscopic (keyhole) approach.

Hernias

A hernia exists where part of the abdominal wall is weakened, and the contents of the abdomen push through to the outside. This is most commonly seen in the groin area but can occur in other places. Surgical treatment is usually quite straightforward and involves returning the abdominal contents to the inside and then reinforcing the abdominal wall in some way.

A hernia exists where part of the abdominal wall is weakened, and the contents of the abdomen push through to the outside. This is most commonly seen in the groin area but can occur in other places. Surgical treatment is usually quite straightforward and involves returning the abdominal contents to the inside and then reinforcing the abdominal wall in some way.

Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric or weight loss surgery refers to a number of different procedures that can be performed to treat obesity. Procedures fall into three main types: Malabsorptive - these procedures involve bypassing a section of the small intestine thus reducing the amount of food absorbed into the body. Restrictive - these procedures involve reducing the size of the stomach, usually by creating a small pouch at the top of the stomach which limits the amount of food that can be eaten. Malabsorptive/Restrictive Combination - these procedures combine both techniques e.g. gastric bypass surgery in which a small stomach pouch is formed and its outlet connected to part of the small intestine.

Bariatric or weight loss surgery refers to a number of different procedures that can be performed to treat obesity. Procedures fall into three main types:

Malabsorptive - these procedures involve bypassing a section of the small intestine thus reducing the amount of food absorbed into the body.

Restrictive - these procedures involve reducing the size of the stomach, usually by creating a small pouch at the top of the stomach which limits the amount of food that can be eaten.

Malabsorptive/Restrictive Combination - these procedures combine both techniques e.g. gastric bypass surgery in which a small stomach pouch is formed and its outlet connected to part of the small intestine.

Skin Disorders

Skin conditions dealt with by general surgery include lumps, tumours and other lesions of the skin and underlying tissues. These are often fairly simple conditions that can be dealt with by performing minor operations under local anaesthetic (the area of skin being treated is numbed). Often these procedures are performed as outpatient or day case procedures.

Skin conditions dealt with by general surgery include lumps, tumours and other lesions of the skin and underlying tissues. These are often fairly simple conditions that can be dealt with by performing minor operations under local anaesthetic (the area of skin being treated is numbed). Often these procedures are performed as outpatient or day case procedures.

Disability Assistance

Wheelchair access

Parking

Free patient parking is available

Contact Details

752 Cameron Road
Tauranga South
Tauranga
Bay Of Plenty 3112

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Street Address

752 Cameron Road
Tauranga South
Tauranga
Bay Of Plenty 3112

This page was last updated at 8:48AM on February 13, 2024. This information is reviewed and edited by Bay Surgery - Daniel Mafi: General, Upper GI & Bariatric Surgeon.