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Hutt, MidCentral, Wellington, East Auckland, South Auckland, Canterbury, Central Lakes, Hawkes Bay > Private Hospitals & Specialists >

Richard Evans - Vascular Surgeon

Private Service, Vascular Surgery

Today

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

Description

Dr Richard Evans is a Vascular Surgeon who runs clinics in the greater Wellington region, the Kapiti Coast and the Wairarapa, New Zealand. Richard also performs varicose vein treatments in Auckland, Hastings, Palmerston North, Christchurch and Queenstown, New Zealand.

He is a Southern Cross Affiliated Provider for:

  • Peripheral angiogram,
  • Peripheral angioplasty,
  • Peripheral angioplasty of distal limb,
  • Peripheral angioplasty with stents,
  • Duplex vein mapping,

He also provides Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT), Ultrasound guided sclerotherapy (UGS), Varicose vein assessment, Varicose vein surgery, Spider vein treatments, Venaseal closure system.


What is Vascular Surgery?
Vascular surgery is the branch of surgery that involves the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the vessels that carry blood away from (arteries) and back to (veins) your heart.

Vascular disorders include blockages and narrowings of the vessels, abnormal swellings of the vessels (aneurysm) or vessel malfunctions.

The disease processes involved in vascular disorders often involve other body systems and your treatment may therefore require the combined efforts of other medical specialists such as radiologists and general physicians.

Staff

  • Practice Manager: Melissa Chan
  • Vascular Access Nurse Specialist: Clare Odell,
  • Registered Nurse: Sarah Treadwell,
  • Registered Nurse: Kendall Brookes
  • Registered Nurse: Ashleigh Robinson

Consultants

How do I access this service?

Contact us

Richard Evans Vascular

p: 0800 45 45 88

w: revascular.co.nz

e: info@revascular.co.nz

m: 022 683 7860

REV Vascular Ultrasound

p: 0800 801 101

w: vascularscans.co.nz

e: requests@vascularscans.co.nz

m: 0272 583 285

REV Vascular Ultrasound is available in Palmerston North, Kapiti, Wellington, Lower Hutt, Wairarapa.

Make an appointment

https://www.revascular.co.nz/contact/

https://www.vascularscans.co.nz/

Referral

General Practitioners; 

Specialists

Referral Expectations

When you come to your appointment, your surgeon will ask questions about your illness and examine you to try to determine or confirm the diagnosis. This process may also require a number of tests (e.g. blood tests, x-rays, scans etc). Sometimes this can all be done during one visit, but for some conditions this will take several follow-up appointments. Occasionally some tests are arranged even before your appointment to try to speed up the process.

Once a diagnosis has been made, your surgeon will discuss treatment with you. In some instances this will mean surgery, while other cases can be managed with medication and advice. If surgery is advised, the steps involved in the surgical process and the likely outcome are usually discussed with you at this time.

Fees and Charges Description

Southern Cross Affiliated Provider and NIB First Choice provider

Hours

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

Mon – Fri 8:30 AM – 5:30 PM

Please call the main number during business hours, Monday to Friday, for all appointments and inquiries.

Procedures / Treatments

Aortic Aneurysm

This is the dilatation or ballooning of a section of the aorta, which is the main artery coming out of the heart. An aneurysm usually occurs because of an underlying weakness in the wall of the aorta at that point. Aneurysms will often run in families and are much more common in men. Smokers are also at greater risk. Usually, you will not have any symptoms from the aneurysm and it may only be discovered through an ultrasound scan or a CT scan. If the aneurysm grows beyond a certain size treatment will be required. Sometimes, aneurysms may cause symptoms such as tenderness, back pain or an awareness of a pulsating lump in your abdomen.

This is the dilatation or ballooning of a section of the aorta, which is the main artery coming out of the heart. An aneurysm usually occurs because of an underlying weakness in the wall of the aorta at that point. Aneurysms will often run in families and are much more common in men. Smokers are also at greater risk.

Usually, you will not have any symptoms from the aneurysm and it may only be discovered through an ultrasound scan or a CT scan. If the aneurysm grows beyond a certain size treatment will be required. Sometimes, aneurysms may cause symptoms such as tenderness, back pain or an awareness of a pulsating lump in your abdomen.

Carotid Artery Disease

You have two carotid arteries, one on either side of your neck, that supply blood to your brain. Carotid artery disease occurs if these arteries become narrowed because of atherosclerosis (a build up of fat and cholesterol deposits on the inner walls of the vessels). If a clot forms in one of the carotid arteries and reduces or stops the flow of blood to part of your brain, it may cause a TIA (mini-stroke) or stroke. You have an increased risk of developing carotid artery disease if you: have a family history of atherosclerosis smoke have high blood pressure (hypertension) have diabetes have coronary artery disease. Treatment involves lifestyle changes eg, stopping smoking, exercising more, dietary changes and medications, such as regular low-dose Aspirin and a statin (anti-cholesterol medication). If there is severe narrowing of the carotid arteries, or you have had a recent stroke, surgery to treat the narrowed segment will be required.

You have two carotid arteries, one on either side of your neck, that supply blood to your brain. Carotid artery disease occurs if these arteries become narrowed because of atherosclerosis (a build up of fat and cholesterol deposits on the inner walls of the vessels). If a clot forms in one of the carotid arteries and reduces or stops the flow of blood to part of your brain, it may cause a TIA (mini-stroke) or stroke.

You have an increased risk of developing carotid artery disease if you:

  • have a family history of atherosclerosis
  • smoke
  • have high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • have diabetes
  • have coronary artery disease.

Treatment involves lifestyle changes eg, stopping smoking, exercising more, dietary changes and medications, such as regular low-dose Aspirin and a statin (anti-cholesterol medication). If there is severe narrowing of the carotid arteries, or you have had a recent stroke, surgery to treat the narrowed segment will be required.

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Peripheral arterial disease refers to the narrowing of arteries outside the heart and brain, usually as the result of atherosclerosis or ‘hardening of the arteries’ (a build up of fatty deposits on the inner wall of arteries). When the arteries become narrowed, the flow of blood to the target organs or tissues is reduced. The arteries commonly affected are those carrying blood to the kidneys, intestines, arms and legs, and the carotid arteries as above. Peripheral arterial disease is common in your legs and may present with a dull, cramping leg pain that occurs when you walk or run but stops when you stand still. This is known as ‘intermittent claudication’. Treatment for peripheral arterial disease may involve medication and/or surgery.

Peripheral arterial disease refers to the narrowing of arteries outside the heart and brain, usually as the result of atherosclerosis or ‘hardening of the arteries’ (a build up of fatty deposits on the inner wall of arteries). When the arteries become narrowed, the flow of blood to the target organs or tissues is reduced.

The arteries commonly affected are those carrying blood to the kidneys, intestines, arms and legs, and the carotid arteries as above. Peripheral arterial disease is common in your legs and may present with a dull, cramping leg pain that occurs when you walk or run but stops when you stand still. This is known as ‘intermittent claudication’.

Treatment for peripheral arterial disease may involve medication and/or surgery.

Varicose Veins

These are bulging veins that lie just beneath the skin (superficial veins). They occur when the walls of a vein are weak or damaged or if the valves in the vein that normally stop the blood from flowing backwards are impaired, resulting in pooling of the blood and stretched veins. Besides being unattractive, varicose veins can be painful and cause inflammation or ulceration. The following different types of surgery are available if varicose veins require treatment: Richard Evans treats varicose veins using Venaseal™ adhesive sealing. Tiny, controlled amounts of medical-grade glue are injected into the vein via a thin tube, using a special dispenser gun. All the while progress is monitored onscreen using ultrasound. Once the adhesive is in place along the vein, pressure is applied to the leg to seal the vein. Typical treatment time is about 30-60 min. Patients need to wear compression stockings for about 10 days afterwards. Adhesive sealing is often accompanied by sclerotherapy. Sclerotherapy – a tiny needle is used to inject a chemical solution into the vein that causes the vein to collapse. This approach is recommended for small varicose veins or spider veins that typically appear on the upper legs. Varicose veins may be treated using laser therapy. Surgery is rarely required these days. Laser treatment is done as a day case, under local anaesthetic. Most patients can return to work after several days. Laser treatment is often accompanied by sclerotherapy – see above.

These are bulging veins that lie just beneath the skin (superficial veins). They occur when the walls of a vein are weak or damaged or if the valves in the vein that normally stop the blood from flowing backwards are impaired, resulting in pooling of the blood and stretched veins. Besides being unattractive, varicose veins can be painful and cause inflammation or ulceration.

The following different types of surgery are available if varicose veins require treatment:

Richard Evans treats varicose veins using Venaseal™ adhesive sealing. Tiny, controlled amounts of medical-grade glue are injected into the vein via a thin tube, using a special dispenser gun. All the while progress is monitored onscreen using ultrasound. Once the adhesive is in place along the vein, pressure is applied to the leg to seal the vein. Typical treatment time is about 30-60 min. Patients need to wear compression stockings for about 10 days afterwards. Adhesive sealing is often accompanied by sclerotherapy.

Sclerotherapy – a tiny needle is used to inject a chemical solution into the vein that causes the vein to collapse. This approach is recommended for small varicose veins or spider veins that typically appear on the upper legs. 

Varicose veins may be treated using laser therapy. Surgery is rarely required these days. Laser treatment is done as a day case, under local anaesthetic. Most patients can return to work after several days. Laser treatment is often accompanied by sclerotherapy – see above.

Primary Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that may occur over the entire body or only in certain parts, most commonly the face, underarms, palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When it affects the palms and armpits, it may be socially and functionally problematic. Primary hyperhidrosis is caused by overactivity of the nerves that carry messages to the affected sweat glands, usually in the armpits and palms of the hands. These nerves are part of the 'sympathetic' nervous system, which means that they are 'involuntary' or not under our conscious control. Treatment may be with topical antiperspirants, oral medications, Botox (botulinum toxin) or may involve a surgical procedure known as Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy (ETS). This is a minimally invasive procedure, which interrupts the nerves that supply the sweat glands. Sometimes ETS may be effective in the treatment of problematic facial flushing.

Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that may occur over the entire body or only in certain parts, most commonly the face, underarms, palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When it affects the palms and armpits, it may be socially and functionally problematic.

Primary  hyperhidrosis is caused by overactivity of the nerves that carry messages to the affected sweat glands, usually  in the armpits and palms of the hands. These nerves are part of the 'sympathetic' nervous system, which means that they are 'involuntary' or not under our conscious control.

Treatment may be with topical antiperspirants, oral medications, Botox (botulinum toxin) or may involve a surgical procedure known as Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy (ETS). This is a minimally invasive procedure, which interrupts the nerves that supply the sweat glands. Sometimes ETS may be effective in the treatment of problematic facial flushing.

Ulcers

Vascular ulcers are open wounds on the skin of the legs that do not heal or that keep coming back after they have healed. Ulcers may be caused by infection, minor trauma or pressure on the skin. They may progress because there is not enough blood being supplied through the arteries to heal the ulcers. Leg ulcers may also be caused by leg oedema (fluid) or varicose veins. Arterial or ischaemic ulcers are typically the result of atherosclerosis or 'hardening of the arteries’ (a build up of fatty deposits on the inner wall of arteries). When the arteries become narrowed, the flow of blood to the tissues is reduced. These ulcers are usually found on the toes, heels or lower legs and are often painful. Treatment for arterial ulcers may involve angioplasty and stents or bypass surgery. Venous ulcers occur when impaired blood flow in the veins causes pooling of blood in the legs. These ulcers are often associated with varicose veins. Venous ulcers are usually found on the lower leg between the knee and the ankle and the leg is often swollen and discoloured. Compression or pressure bandages are the main treatment for venous ulcers although surgery may be required in some patients.

Vascular ulcers are open wounds on the skin of the legs that do not heal or that keep coming back after they have healed. Ulcers may be caused by infection, minor trauma or pressure on the skin. They may progress because there is not enough blood being supplied through the arteries to heal the ulcers. Leg ulcers may also be caused by leg oedema (fluid) or varicose veins.

Arterial or ischaemic ulcers are typically the result of atherosclerosis or 'hardening of the arteries’ (a build up of fatty deposits on the inner wall of arteries). When the arteries become narrowed, the flow of blood to the tissues is reduced. These ulcers are usually found on the toes, heels or lower legs and are often painful. Treatment for arterial ulcers may involve angioplasty and stents or bypass surgery.

Venous ulcers occur when impaired blood flow in the veins causes pooling of blood in the legs. These ulcers are often associated with varicose veins. Venous ulcers are usually found on the lower leg between the knee and the ankle and the leg is often swollen and discoloured. Compression or pressure bandages are the main treatment for venous ulcers although surgery may be required in some patients.

REV Vascular Ultrasound

REV Vascular Ultrasound, a subsidiary of Richard Evans Vascular, helps diagnose conditions like varicose veins, spider veins, blood clots, blocked arteries for intermittent claudication, ulcers, TIAs, stroke, and aneurysms. Offering vein and artery ultrasound scans for diagnosis of vein or artery conditions. IANZ accredited.

REV Vascular Ultrasound, a subsidiary of Richard Evans Vascular, helps diagnose conditions like varicose veins, spider veins, blood clots, blocked arteries for intermittent claudication, ulcers, TIAs, stroke, and aneurysms.

Offering vein and artery ultrasound scans for diagnosis of vein or artery conditions. 

IANZ accredited.

Public Transport

Details of bus services for the entire region are available through the Metlink website, including a journey planner, fare information, and upcoming departures information from stops.

Parking

Patient parking is available at all locations.

Contact Details

Wakefield Specialist Centre, 99 Rintoul Street, Newtown, Wellington

Wellington

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Pamir House, Level 1, Ghuznee Street, Te Aro, Wellington

Wellington

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Bowen Specialist Centre, 98 Churchill Drive, Crofton Downs, Wellington

Wellington

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Boulcott Specialist Centre, 666 High Street, Lower Hutt

Hutt

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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135 Witako Street, Epuni, Lower Hutt

Hutt

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Kapiti Day Hospital, 45B Te Roto Drive, Paraparaumu

Wellington

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Five Rivers Medical Building, 30 Bidwills Cutting Road, Greytown

Wairarapa

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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266 Broadway Avenue, Palmerston North, Manawatu-Wanganui

MidCentral

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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109 Canning Road, Hastings

Hawkes Bay

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Compass Building, The Marina, Ara Tai Road, Half Moon Bay, Auckland

East Auckland

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Stewart Street Specialists, 40 Stewart Street, Christchurch

Canterbury

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Southern Cross Central Lakes Hospital

Central Lakes

8:30 AM to 5:30 PM.

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This page was last updated at 11:37AM on March 19, 2024. This information is reviewed and edited by Richard Evans - Vascular Surgeon.