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BreastScreen Counties Manukau

Public Service, Breast

Today

8:00 AM to 4:30 PM.

Description

The BreastScreen Aotearoa (BSA) programme offers free, two yearly screening mammograms to eligible women aged 45-69 years.

Regular breast screening is important.  Don't put it off, it could save your life.

Our aim is to ensure your mammogram is as easy and comfortable as possible:

  • Free mammograms take 20-30 minutes
  • You choose when and where you have your mammogram
  • Our female staff are respectful, friendly and understanding
  • We have late nights and Saturday appointments
  • You can bring a support person
  • We can arrange a free interpreter for you

You can enrol yourself by calling our free phone number 0800 270 200.

Is English your second language?

  • Samoan speakers can call Lisi on 09 250 8089
  • Mandarin speakers - call Veronica on 09 250 8025
  • Hindi speakers - call Yolanda on 09 250 8084 

When you receive your invitation letter with a suggested date and location, call us on 0800 270 200 to confirm your appointment time.  If another date or location suits you better, we will do our best to accommodate you.

Once enrolled on the programme, you will be re-invited every two years by BreastScreen Aotearoa. If you move house or change your postal address, please contact us to update your address so that your next invitation letter reaches you.

BreastScreen Counties Manukau

 

 

Consultants

Referral Expectations

Women who wish to enrol on the programme, can enrol themselves by calling BreastScreen Aotearoa on freephone 0800 270 200 or BreastScreen Counties Manukau on (09) 250 8000.

Your GP may also enrol you, although you do not need a referral from your GP to enrol on the programme.

Who can have a free screening mammogram?

A woman can have a free screening mammogram every two years through BreastScreen Aotearoa if she:

  • is between 45 and 69 years old
  • has no symptoms of breast cancer
  • has not had a mammogram in the last 12 months
  • is not pregnant or breastfeeding
  • is eligible for public health services in New Zealand, i.e. is a New Zealand citizen or has a New Zealand visa that is valid for at least two years.

If a woman has a breast symptom that has been present for less than twelve months, she is not eligible to enrol with BreastScreen Aotearoa.  

Women of any age who feel or notice anything unusual about their breasts, at any time, should see their doctor. 

Most lumps and symptoms will not be cancer.  

Women with mobility disabilities

We can screen women in wheelchairs or with mobility issues at our main screening location of Manukau SuperClinic in Manurewa or at our sub-sites in Howick, Pukekohe and Botany.  

Unfortunately, we are not able to accommodate wheelchairs on our mobile screening unit due to space issues.

Please make sure when you book your appointment, that we are aware of any mobility issues or other disabilities you may have, as we will allow extra time.

Women with breast implants

Women with breast implants can have mammograms at any of our screening sites.  When you book your appointment, please ensure we are aware that you have implants so that we can allow extra time.


Women under 45 years of age

Three-quarters of women diagnosed with breast cancer in New Zealand are 50 years and older.  Studies show that for women aged 50 and over, the risk of death from breast cancer is reduced by about a third with two yearly screening mammograms.  In women aged 45 - 50 years, the risk of death from breast cancer is reduced by a fifth with regular mammography.

Research shows that mammograms are not as good at detecting breast cancer and saving lives in younger women, particularly before menopause.  In younger women, the breast tissue may be more dense, making mammograms harder to read and increasing the risk of missing cancers.  Women under 45 are more likely to have something show up on their mammogram that needs checking but turns out not to be cancer, causing unnecessary worry.

If you feel or notice anything about your breasts that is not usual for you, please see your doctor. Your doctor may then refer to the diagnostic breast clinic in your area for free assessment of any abnormality in your breast. 

Women with a family history of breast cancer or other risk factors

A strong family history of breast cancer includes a mother, sister, daughter, male relative or two aunts with premenopausal or bilateral breast cancer, or multiple family members. 

Women who have a strong history of premenopausal breast cancer in their family may be eligible for free yearly mammograms through their local District Health Board (DHB), if referred by their doctor.  If these women are eligible for the BreastScreen Aotearoa programme, they may alternate yearly between BreastScreen Aotearoa mammograms and the DHB's mammography unit.

Women with other specific risk factors for breast cancer may also be eligible for free yearly screening through their DHB.  These include a past history of breast cancer, Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia, Lobular Carcinoma In-Situ, radiotherapy, a history of mantle radiotherapy or BRCA I or II. 

Speak to your doctor for a referral through the public health system if you believe you may be eligible for yearly screening.

Women who have had breast cancer

If you have had breast cancer it is very important that you have regular check-ups with your doctor, especially in the first five years after your cancer was found.  These should include a thorough breast examination and an annual mammogram.  One of the reasons for this is that you are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer again.

BreastScreen Aotearoa recommends that you continue to visit your breast specialist or usual doctor for these ongoing annual check-ups.  The specialist or doctor will organise an annual mammogram for you.  This mammogram is free if it is through a public hospital.

When can you rejoin BreastScreen Aotearoa after having breast cancer?

After having breast cancer, you can have a screening mammogram every two years through BreastScreen Aotearoa if:

  • you are between 45 and 69 years old
  • you have no breast problems
  • you are not pregnant or breastfeeding
  • your breast cancer was treated more than five years ago and you have been cleared by your doctor to return to the BreastScreen Aotearoa programme.

If you do rejoin BreastScreen Aotearoa you should still continue to have an annual breast examination by your doctor.  A normal consultation fee would usually be charged.

Fees and Charges Description

There are no charges for services to public patients if you are lawfully in New Zealand and meet one of the Eligibility Direction’s specified criteria set by the Ministry of Health.

If you do not meet the criteria, you will be required to pay for the full costs of any medical treatment you receive during your stay.

To check whether you meet the specified eligibility criteria, visit the Ministry of Health website www.moh.govt.nz/eligibility

For charges, please phone the Accounts Receivable Office on (09) 276 0060.

Hours

8:00 AM to 4:30 PM.

Mon – Fri 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Sat 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Procedures / Treatments

Information about Mammography

BreastScreen Counties Manukau provides a free MAMMOGRAM every 2 years to women enrolled on the programme. IMPORTANT NOTE: It is important that you bring any previous mammograms you have had along with you to your appointment. Also please do not use talcum powder or deodorants on the day of your mammogram, as these can make cancers harder to find on the mammogram. If you wear a two piece garment on the day of your mammogram it will make preparing for the x-ray easier. What is a mammogram? A mammogram is an x-ray of the breasts. They can detect breast cancer early which means a very good chance of successful treatment. They are safe because they only use very small amounts of radiation. When you have a mammogram, the medical radiation technologist (radiographer) who takes the X-rays places each breast in turn between two plates on the X-ray machine. The plates hold the breast firmly for a few seconds while the pictures are taken. Many women find this uncomfortable and a few find it painful. It does not harm the breasts. Will the mammogram hurt? During your mammogram, your breast will be held for a few seconds between two plates. Many women find this uncomfortable and a few find it painful. It does not last long and does not harm the breast. Do I have to take my clothes off? You will need to undress from the waist up so it is a good idea to wear a skirt or trousers and a top. You will be offered a robe to wear during the appointment. Our MRTs are women of all ages and will respect your modesty as much as possible. They are very professional and will do their best to ensure you feel comfortable and at ease. They take mammograms for women of a wide range of ages, ethnicities and sizes. What do mammograms show? Mammograms: can show changes in the breast before anything can be seen or felt. In most cases, the changes will not be cancer can detect breast cancer early which means a very good chance of successful treatment are particularly effective in detecting breast cancer for women 50 years and over who have mammograms every two years can detect about 75% of unsuspected cancers in women under 50 and 85% in women over 50 cannot prevent you getting breast cancer and cannot always prevent death from breast cancer are safe because only very small amounts of radiation are used What are my chances of getting breast cancer? The risk of breast cancer increases as you get older. Of those women who get breast cancer, three-quarters are 50 years and over. Most women who get cancer have a close relative with the disease. Even among women with a family history of breast cancer, only a very small number will be at high risk of getting breast cancer. How accurate are the mammograms? Like other screening tests, mammograms are not perfect. A mammogram may suggest that something is not right when, in fact, all is well. This is called a false positive result. You may notice symptoms of breast cancer between your two-yearly screening tests. This is called an interval cancer and can happen because: some cancers do not show up on a mammogram. This is more likely in women before menopause who often have dense breast tissue. The density usually reduces as women age and go through menopause; the radiologists (x-ray doctors) looking at the mammogram may miss the cancer. This will happen sometimes, no matter how experienced the radiologists are; sometimes a fast growing cancer will develop. Are mammograms safe? Only a very small amount of radiation is used in mammography, so the radiation risk is very low. BreastScreen Aotearoa monitors the equipment used to take mammograms to ensure radiation is kept to a minimum. Do I need to have regular mammograms even if I am well and have no lumps in my breasts? Yes. A mammogram can show changes and abnormalities (something unusual) in your breasts before anything can be seen or felt. It is the best available test to detect small cancers at an early stage when there is a very good chance of successful treatment. What are the limitations of breast screening? A mammogram is not a perfect test. Cancers will be missed in some women. On the other hand, the vast majority of women who take part in breast screening do not have breast cancer. These women do not gain a benefit from breast screening, but they can be harmed. There are limitations and risks to women in mammography screening.

BreastScreen Counties Manukau provides a free MAMMOGRAM every 2 years to women enrolled on the programme.
 
IMPORTANT NOTE:  It is important that you bring any previous mammograms you have had along with you to your appointment.  Also please do not use talcum powder or deodorants on the day of your mammogram, as these can make cancers harder to find on the mammogram.
If you wear a two piece garment on the day of your mammogram it will make preparing for the x-ray easier.
 
What is a mammogram?

A mammogram is an x-ray of the breasts. They can detect breast cancer early which means a very good chance of successful treatment. They are safe because they only use very small amounts of radiation. 

When you have a mammogram, the medical radiation technologist (radiographer) who takes the X-rays places each breast in turn between two plates on the X-ray machine.  

The plates hold the breast firmly for a few seconds while the pictures are taken.  Many women find this uncomfortable and a few find it painful.  It does not harm the breasts.

Will the mammogram hurt?

During your mammogram, your breast will be held for a few seconds between two plates.  Many women find this uncomfortable and a few find it painful.  It does not last long and does not harm the breast. 

Do I have to take my clothes off?

You will need to undress from the waist up so it is a good idea to wear a skirt or trousers and a top.  You will be offered a robe to wear during the appointment.

Our MRTs are women of all ages and will respect your modesty as much as possible. They are very professional and will do their best to ensure you feel comfortable and at ease.  They take mammograms for women of a wide range of ages, ethnicities and sizes. 

What do mammograms show?

Mammograms:

  • can show changes in the breast before anything can be seen or felt.  In most cases, the changes will not be cancer
  • can detect breast cancer early which means a very good chance of successful treatment
  • are particularly effective in detecting breast cancer for women 50 years and over who have mammograms every two years
  • can detect about 75% of unsuspected cancers in women under 50 and 85% in women over 50
  • cannot prevent you getting breast cancer and cannot always prevent death from breast cancer
  • are safe because only very small amounts of radiation are used

What are my chances of getting breast cancer?

The risk of breast cancer increases as you get older.  Of those women who get breast cancer, three-quarters are 50 years and over.

Most women who get cancer have a close relative with the disease.  Even among women with a family history of breast cancer, only a very small number will be at high risk of getting breast cancer.

How accurate are the mammograms?

Like other screening tests, mammograms are not perfect. A mammogram may suggest that something is not right when, in fact, all is well.  This is called a false positive result.

You may notice symptoms of breast cancer between your two-yearly screening tests.  This is called an interval cancer and can happen because:

  • some cancers do not show up on a mammogram.  This is more likely in women before menopause who often have dense breast tissue.  The density usually reduces as women age and go through menopause;
  • the radiologists (x-ray doctors) looking at the mammogram may miss the cancer.  This will happen sometimes, no matter how experienced the radiologists are;
  • sometimes a fast growing cancer will develop.

Are mammograms safe?

Only a very small amount of radiation is used in mammography, so the radiation risk is very low. BreastScreen Aotearoa monitors the equipment used to take mammograms to ensure radiation is kept to a minimum.

Do I need to have regular mammograms even if I am well and have no lumps in my breasts?

Yes.  A mammogram can show changes and abnormalities (something unusual) in your breasts before anything can be seen or felt.  It is the best available test to detect small cancers at an early stage when there is a very good chance of successful treatment.

What are the limitations of breast screening?

A mammogram is not a perfect test.  Cancers will be missed in some women.  On the other hand, the vast majority of women who take part in breast screening do not have breast cancer.  These women do not gain a benefit from breast screening, but they can be harmed.  There are limitations and risks to women in mammography screening.

Breast Health and Symptoms

BreastScreen Aotearoa is a programme designed for women who have no apparent breast problems. Women of any age who feel or notice anything unusual about their breasts should see their doctor. Breast symptoms can be assessed for free through the public health system. Important information about breast cancer: The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age Free mammograms (breast x-rays) are available for women aged 45-69 years through the BreastScreen Aotearoa programme Screening mammograms detect breast cancer before you can feel or notice anything unusual Early detection and treatment can save lives Mammograms need to be repeated every two years Most women who have two-yearly mammograms will be informed they have no evidence of breast cancer Most women who develop breast cancer have no relatives with the disease Women of any age who feel or notice anything unusual about their breasts should seek advice from their doctor. Breast symptoms or concerns Most lumps and symptoms will not be cancer. However, if you notice any breast symptoms or changes, it is very important that you see your doctor straight away. Don't wait for your next screening mammogram. Women with breast symptoms or concerns at any age should see their doctor, who may refer them for free assessment through their residential District Health Board. If any further treatment is required, this is also free. The most common symptom of breast cancer is a painless lump. However, the following problems should also prompt you to see your doctor as soon as possible, particularly if the changes are not normal to you. Possible signs of breast cancer are: a new lump or thickening a change in breast shape or size pain or tenderness in the breast that is unusual puckering or dimpling of the skin a rash or reddening of the skin that appears only on one breast any change in one nipple, such as a turned-in nipple or a discharge that occurs without squeezing a rash or reddening appearing only on the breast. Breast lumps All breasts have areas of lumpiness that fluctuate with the menstrual cycle. In younger women: most lumps have a hormonal basis, so if any lump persists after one menstrual cycle it should be examined by your doctor. In older women new lumps should be investigated straightaway by your GP. Breast Awareness You may find breast cancer earlier by being aware of your breasts and any changes that are not normal for you. Looking at your breasts in the mirror and being aware of any new change them while washing or dressing is important as you get older, especially after age 40. This is recommended for all women, even if they are having mammograms. These changes are not usually subtle, and feel very different to normal breast tissue (even if that is lumpy to the woman). In the past, some women were taught a formal technique of breast self-examination. This recommendation is no longer made as there is no evidence that this formal self-examination will reduce a woman’s chances of dying from breast cancer. It can also increase a woman’s risk of having unnecessary biopsies. If you notice any changes in your breasts you should always see your doctor even if you have just had a mammogram. Your doctor may then refer you for further tests.

BreastScreen Aotearoa is a programme designed for women who have no apparent breast problems. 

Women of any age who feel or notice anything unusual about their breasts should see their doctor. Breast symptoms can be assessed for free through the public health system.

Important information about breast cancer:

  • The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age
  • Free mammograms (breast x-rays) are available for women aged 45-69 years through the BreastScreen Aotearoa programme
  • Screening mammograms detect breast cancer before you can feel or notice anything unusual
  • Early detection and treatment can save lives
  • Mammograms need to be repeated every two years
  • Most women who have two-yearly mammograms will be informed they have no evidence of breast cancer
  • Most women who develop breast cancer have no relatives with the disease
  • Women of any age who feel or notice anything unusual about their breasts should seek advice from their doctor.

Breast symptoms or concerns

Most lumps and symptoms will not be cancer.  However, if you notice any breast symptoms or changes, it is very important that you see your doctor straight away.  Don't wait for your next screening mammogram.

Women with breast symptoms or concerns at any age should see their doctor, who may refer them for free assessment through their residential District Health Board.  If any further treatment is required, this is also free. 

The most common symptom of breast cancer is a painless lump.  However, the following problems should also prompt you to see your doctor as soon as possible, particularly if the changes are not normal to you.

Possible signs of breast cancer are:

  • a new lump or thickening
  • a change in breast shape or size
  • pain or tenderness in the breast that is unusual
  • puckering or dimpling of the skin
  • a rash or reddening of the skin that appears only on one breast
  • any change in one nipple, such as a turned-in nipple or a discharge that occurs without squeezing
  • a rash or reddening appearing only on the breast.

Breast lumps

All breasts have areas of lumpiness that fluctuate with the menstrual cycle.

In younger women: most lumps have a hormonal basis, so if any lump persists after one menstrual cycle it should be examined by your doctor.

In older women new lumps should be investigated straightaway by your GP. 

Breast Awareness

You may find breast cancer earlier by being aware of your breasts and any changes that are not normal for you. 

Looking at your breasts in the mirror and being aware of any new change them while washing or dressing is important as you get older, especially after age 40. This is recommended for all women, even if they are having mammograms.

These changes are not usually subtle, and feel very different to normal breast tissue (even if that is lumpy to the woman).

In the past, some women were taught a formal technique of breast self-examination. This recommendation is no longer made as there is no evidence that this formal self-examination will reduce a woman’s chances of dying from breast cancer. It can also increase a woman’s risk of having unnecessary biopsies.

If you notice any changes in your breasts you should always see your doctor even if you have just had a mammogram.  Your doctor may then refer you for further tests.  

Mobile Screening Unit

Our mobile screening unit moves around the district to give women the opportunity to have a mammogram at a location convenient to them. We visit locations such as Waiuku, Beachlands, Pakuranga, Highland Park, Tuakau, Pukekohe, Papakura, Otara and more. We also have fixed site locations at Manukau SuperClinic, Mangere, Botany, Pukekohe and Howick. Phone 09 250 8000 or freephone 0800 270 200 to book your appointment. Appointments are required on the mobile unit but we do our best to fit in walk-ins if time permits. There is likely to be a short wait in these circumstances. We only have very short waiting lists at our sites and you can choose which site suits you best. Schedule is subject to change, so please phone 09 250 8000 for the latest information.

Our mobile screening unit moves around the district to give women the opportunity to have a mammogram at a location convenient to them.  

We visit locations such as Waiuku, Beachlands, Pakuranga, Highland Park, Tuakau, Pukekohe, Papakura, Otara and more. 

We also have fixed site locations at Manukau SuperClinic, Mangere, Botany, Pukekohe and Howick.

Phone 09 250 8000 or freephone 0800 270 200 to book your appointment.

Appointments are required on the mobile unit but we do our best to fit in walk-ins if time permits. There is likely to be a short wait in these circumstances.

We only have very short waiting lists at our sites and you can choose which site suits you best.

Schedule is subject to change, so please phone 09 250 8000 for the latest information.

Information for Maori Women

"Ko to oranga, te oranga mo to whanau" Your wellbeing is wellbeing for you family. At BreastScreen Counties Manukau we aim to make the process as easy, comfortable and convenient as possible. You can choose when and where you have your mammogram our aim is to make the process as easy, comfortable and convenient as possible. We have Maaori staff who can support you during the process: Appointments only 20 - 30 minutes You can bring a support person Saturday and late night appointments available We can arrange transport if you need it We have the latest in digital mammography equipment You can change your appointment. Regular mammograms can save lives by detecting cancer early, before they can be felt or seen. Mammograms are free for women aged 45-69 through BreastScreen Aotearoa. It is important to continue having mammograms every two years once on the programme. Most women who have two-yearly mammograms will be informed they have no evidence of breast cancer. "Whangaihia te Ukaipo" Look after that which gives sustenance and life

"Ko to oranga, te oranga mo to whanau" Your wellbeing is wellbeing for you family.

At BreastScreen Counties Manukau we aim to make the process as easy, comfortable and convenient as possible.

You can choose when and where you have your mammogram our aim is to make the process as easy, comfortable and convenient as possible.  We have Maaori staff who can support you during the process:

  • Appointments only 20 - 30 minutes
  • You can bring a support person
  • Saturday and late night appointments available
  • We can arrange transport if you need it
  • We have the latest in digital mammography equipment
  • You can change your appointment.

Regular mammograms can save lives by detecting  cancer early, before they can be felt or seen.

Mammograms are free for women aged 45-69 through BreastScreen Aotearoa.

It is important to continue having mammograms every two years once on the programme.

Most women who have two-yearly mammograms will be informed they have no evidence of breast cancer.

"Whangaihia te Ukaipo"  Look after that which gives sustenance and life

Information for Pacific Island women

Talofa Lava, Kia Orana, Malo e lelei, Fakalofa Lahi Atu, Ni sa Bula Vinaka, Namaste, Talohaini, Warm Pacific Greetings BreastScreen Counties Manukau offers free mammograms (breast x-rays) every two years to women ages 45 - 69 years to check for early breast cancer. It is a FREE programme. If English is not your first language: Samoan speakers can call Lisi on 09 250 8089. Niuean speakers can call Malama on 09 250 8061. The risk of breast cancer increases with age. Most women who get breast cancer: are over 50 years old have no relatives with the disease

Talofa Lava, Kia Orana, Malo e lelei,  Fakalofa Lahi Atu, Ni sa Bula Vinaka, Namaste, Talohaini, Warm Pacific Greetings

BreastScreen Counties Manukau offers free mammograms (breast x-rays) every two years to women ages 45 - 69 years to check for early breast cancer.  It is a FREE programme.

If English is not your first language:

  • Samoan speakers can call Lisi on 09 250 8089. 
  • Niuean speakers can call Malama on 09 250 8061.

The risk of breast cancer increases with age.  Most women who get breast cancer:

  • are over 50 years old
  • have no relatives with the disease

Other

BreastScreen Counties Manukau Team:

  • Programme Manager: Kathy Pritchard
  • Medical Director/Radiologist: Sally Urry
  • Breast Care Nurses: Olivia Flannigan, Fiona Goldfinch and Imelda Milich
  • Charge MRT (Medical Radiation Technologist): Katie Cooper
  • Quality Control MRT: Ruth Sharp
  • Medical Radiation Technologist: Kogie Dhanapaul, Joana Guffens, Farah Davies, Carmel Moodley, Irene (Wen-Hsien) Ho, Loraiza Arzooh, Esterna Josephs, Lusiana Tabuavula, Donney West
  • Data Manager:  Lucy Xie
  • Administration Team Leader: Radhika Devi
  • Administration: Verona Puru, Yolanda Sequeira, Alexandra Wong, Lisi Bakker, Mary-Anne Barnes, Sanjana Kumar, Nalini Singh, Enjili Lal, Patiola Matalave, Laura Day, Arnesh Chandra, Salome Nel and Lineta Suafo'a
  • Support to Services Team Leader: Janice Miller
  • Māori Kaimahi Support to Services: Robina Karanga
  • Asian Support to Services: Veronica (Sook) Liew
  • Community Health Workers: Tamara Taka-Jones and Tui Kaihau
  • Practice Team Liaison: Malama Atutolu
  • Practice Team Liaison: Parmjeet Kaur-Sidhu
  • Support to Screening Admin Support: Kim-Maree Swales
  • Team Secretary: Tina Arkley-Perry
  • Business Analyst/Quality Coordinator: Charlotte Timoko

Contact Details

Manukau SuperClinic™

South Auckland

8:00 AM to 4:30 PM.

BreastScreen Aotearoa: Freephone 0800 270 200

Our main screening site is at Manukau SuperClinic.  We also have subsites at:

  • Mangere Community Health Centre | 10 Waddon Place, Mangere
  • Mercy Radiology - Botany SuperClinic | 260 Botany Road, Botany
  • ARG Howick | 18 Fencible Drive, Howick
  • ARG Pukekohe | 10 West Street, Pukekohe

 

901 Great South Road
Manurewa
Auckland

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Street Address

901 Great South Road
Manurewa
Auckland

Postal Address

PO Box 98743
Manukau City 2241

This page was last updated at 11:32AM on June 11, 2024. This information is reviewed and edited by BreastScreen Counties Manukau.