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Northland DHB Cancer & Blood Service

Public Service

Description

Northland DHB Cancer and Blood Service

We provide:

  1. medical consultation and outpatient chemotherapy programmes
  2. links to specialised nurses, palliative care, the Cancer Society and Auckland Oncology Services.

Haematology and radiation cancer services are provided by visiting Auckland specialists.

What is Oncology?
Oncology is the area of medicine involving cancer.  An oncologist is a doctor specialising in the treatment of cancer either with chemotherapy (medical oncologist) or radiation (radiation oncologist).  Other doctors are involved in the treatment of cancer such as haematologists (doctors who specialise in cancer and other diseases of the blood), surgeons, palliative care specialists (doctors who specialise in the treatment of symptoms from cancer that cannot be cured) and general physicians (who often are involved in the diagnosis of cancer).  If you have cancer you are likely to be referred to some of these doctors depending on the type of treatment that is advised.  The Cancer & Blood Service also consists of specialised nurses, therapists and social workers as the diagnosis of cancer can affect people and their families in many ways.  The Cancer & Blood Service also works alongside hospices and the Cancer Society www.cancernz.org.nz who provide support to people with the diagnosis of cancer.

 
What is Cancer?
Everyone’s body is made up of millions of cells, which normally grow, divide and are renewed in a balanced or programmed way. Sometimes this process is disrupted and the cells grow in an uncontrolled way – a solid group of these cells is called a tumour. Another word commonly used for tumour is growth and it can mean the same thing.
 
A tumour/growth can be benign (grows but will not spread into different parts of the body) or malignant (spreads into different parts of the body as well as grows locally). Tumours spread by cells travelling through the lymphatic system (the body’s cleaning system) to lymph nodes (often known as glands) or through blood to other organs in the body. These cells can then multiply.  If this happens the cancer is called metastatic.
Cancer isn't contagious, so you can go on being close to family and friends.

Hours

8.00am - 5.30pm Monday to Friday

Referral Expectations

Usually referral to the Cancer & Blood Service is by letter from another doctor, such as a GP or surgeon. One of our consultants oncologists will read through the letter and ask our clerical staff to book an appointment, taking account of the urgency of the condition.

When you come to Cancer & Blood Outpatients you will be seen by an oncologist who will ask questions about your illness, examine you, and discuss the management of your condition. We encourage people to bring a family member or other support person to sit in on their visit. 

You will then see a cancer nurse who will talk to you about your treatment and what to expect.

Procedures / Treatments

  • Making the Diagnosis

    Cancer is diagnosed with a number of tests but usually a biopsy is needed.  This is where a sample of the tumour/growth is sent to the laboratory to be examined under the microscope.  This can tell the doctors exactly what type of cancer is present and guides them to what… More

  • Surgical Treatment

    Surgery is the oldest form of treatment for cancer. Surgery offers the greatest chance for cure for many types of cancer, especially those cancers that have not yet spread to other parts of the body.… More

  • Radiotherapy

    Radiation therapy uses special equipment to deliver high doses of radiation (beam of x-rays) to cancerous tumours, to kill or damage them so they cannot grow or spread.   Normal cells may be affected by radiation, but most appear to recover fully from the effects of the treatment.… More

  • Chemotherapy

    Chemotherapy is the use of medicines to kill or reduce the spread of cancer cells.  Chemotherapy is given as cycles and may be given once a day, once a week or even once a month.… More

  • Chemotherapy and Infections

    Chemotherapy reduces the production of white blood cells made by your bone marrow.… More

  • Implantable Port

    Implantable ports (sometimes called portacaths or subcutaneous ports) are often used to give chemotherapy treatment and/or other medicines to both adults and children with cancer.… More

  • Alternative Treatments

    It is very common for people with cancer to want to try other non-medical treatments such as diet or alternative/complementary medicines offered by other practitioners.  It is helpful for your cancer team to know what other therapies you might be taking as sometimes there can be interactions with their treatment. More

Document Downloads

Refreshments

Tea and coffee provided.  If your treatment is over the whole day, lunch will also be provided.  Feel free to bring any snacks with you. 

Parking

At Jim Carney Cancer Centre, Hospital Rd. 

Turn left just past the Centre and follow directions to "Undercover parking".

The first hour is free then charges apply after this first hour, the pay machine is also eftpos only. If you are a patient receiving Chemo your parking is free on the days of treatment.

Contact Details

Whangarei Hospital

Northland

Jim Carney Cancer Centre
Hospital Rd
Whangarei

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Street Address

Jim Carney Cancer Centre
Hospital Rd
Whangarei

Postal Address

Whangarei Hospital
Cancer & Blood Service
Maunu Road
Private Bag 9742
Whangarei 0148

This page was last updated at 12:43PM on June 13, 2017. This information is reviewed and edited by Northland DHB Cancer & Blood Service.