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Sexual Health Service | Auckland | Te Toka Tumai | Te Whatu Ora

Public Service, Sexual Health

Description

Formerly Auckland Sexual Health Service

The Auckland Regional Sexual Health provides free, expert and confidential sexual health care to people in the Auckland region.

Our focus is to provide sexual health care to those that really need to be seen by us.  This means that some people who have a sexual health concern may be guided to see their GP (family doctor), Family Planning or other health care service in the first instance.

Auckland Regional Sexual Health also welcomes all transgender and gender diverse people who want to access gender affirming healthcare. We will work with you to establish your transition related health goals and provide support around an individualised health plan that may include accessing other specialist services such as: fertility, voice therapy, endocrinology, gynaecology, urology, mental health, general and plastic surgical services as needed.

Services provided include:

  • diagnosis and management of sexually transmitted infections and other related conditions
  • sexual health counselling
  • gender affirming health care, including initiation of hormonal therapies, for gender diverse and transgender clients
  • Auckland Sexual Assault Service - Pohutukawa. Adult sexual abuse service including the care of related medical, nursing and social issues. Click here for further information:
  • sexual health education for clients and health professionals, including Peer Sexuality Support programmes for schools

How do I make an appointment?
There are three ways you can access the service:

  1. You can ring us on 0800 SEX HEALTH (0800 739 432) to speak to a nurse.  We will need to ask you a few questions to make sure you are eligible to be seen by us and to make sure you are booked with the right person to look after your needs.  This will also let us know how urgently we need to see you and if your partner needs to be seen too.
  2. You can go to our website (http://www.ashs.org.nz/) and contact us through the APPOINTMENT OPTION.
  3. You can ask for a referral from your GP (family doctor) or primary care provider.

We want to make sure that everyone gets the sexual health/gender health care they need so if you are not sure where to go please check our website or give us a ring and we will either book an appointment at our service or we will support you to access the best service to meet your health needs.

For further information:  www.ashs.org.nz  

What is Sexual Health Medicine?
Sexual ​​Health ​​Medicine is the specialised area of practice concerned with healthy sexual relations. Sexual ​​Health ​​Medicine​ ​​clinicians work collaboratively with a multidisciplinary team to improve the sexual health outcomes of the individual and the community by identifying and minimising sexual health issues through education, behaviour change, advocacy, screening, clinical service provision, surveillance and research.

Sexual Health Medicine provides the diagnosis and management of sexually transmitted infections & HIV care, including sexual health care for: adolescents; sex workers; refugees and immigrants; gay, lesbian, and transgender populations.

Other areas of expertise include: genital dermatology; genital pain; reproductive health including contraception; and sexual assault care. 

For Healthcare professionals seeking advice after hours please click here

Consultants

Note: Please note below that some people are not available at all locations.

  • Dr Sunita Azariah

    Sexual Health Physician

    Available at Greenlane Clinical Centre, South Auckland Sexual Health Clinic

  • Dr Christine Foley

    Sexual Assault Physician

    Not available on location.

  • Dr Rose Forster

    Sexual Health Physician

    Available at Greenlane Clinical Centre, West Auckland Sexual Health Clinic

  • Dr Eva Gregory

    Family Planning & Reproductive Health Physician

    Available at Greenlane Clinical Centre, South Auckland Sexual Health Clinic, North Shore Sexual Health Service

  • Dr Anne Laking

    Sexual Assault Physician - Service Lead Clinician

    Not available on location.

  • Dr Joanna Lambert

    Sexual Assault Physician

    Not available on location.

  • Dr Jeannie Oliphant

    Sexual Health Physician - Clinical Director

    Available at Greenlane Clinical Centre, West Auckland Sexual Health Clinic

  • Dr H.Patel

    Sexual Health Physician

    Available at Greenlane Clinical Centre, South Auckland Sexual Health Clinic, West Auckland Sexual Health Clinic

  • Dr Nicky Perkins

    Sexual Health Physician

    Available at Greenlane Clinical Centre, North Shore Sexual Health Service

Referral Expectations

  • You can be seen by the Auckland Sexual Health Service either with or without a referral from your General Practitioner.
  • If your General Practitioner has referred you, you should receive a letter from the clinic giving you an appointment within 2 weeks.
  • If you don't have a referral, you can phone the clinic and make your own appointment.
  • If you have symptoms and urgently need to be seen, you can phone the clinic and speak to one of the nurses. You should get an appointment within 48 hours.

Charges

There is no charge for a consultation at Auckland Sexual Health Service and most medication necessary for the treatment of sexually transmitted infections is provided free of charge.

Hours

Greenlane Clinical Centre

OPENING HOURS

Central Auckland Sexual Health Clinic click here.

South Auckland Sexual Health Clinic

CLINIC HOURS: click here.

 

West Auckland Sexual Health Clinic

CLINIC HOURS: click here

North Shore Sexual Health Service

CLINIC HOURS : click here

Common Conditions

Bacterial Vaginosis

Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) a condition caused by overgrowth of bacteria that normally live in the vagina. It is not a sexually transmitted infection therefore treatment of partners does not tend to help. Symptoms It is common to have no symptoms but, if present, they may include a watery, grey discharge and a fishy odour. Diagnosis BV is diagnosed by examination of a sample of vaginal fluid under a microscope. Causes of BV The exact cause of BV is not known, but it is found more commonly in women who are sexually active. BV may appear shortly after a change of sexual partner, and other sexually transmitted diseases are often found to be present. Treatment Treatment is with antibiotic tablets. BV is only treated when there are obvious symptoms, if you are about to have a medical procedure such as IUCD insertion or a gynaecological procedure, or in some situations during pregnancy.

Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) a condition caused by overgrowth of bacteria that normally live in the vagina. It is not a sexually transmitted infection therefore treatment of partners does not tend to help.

Symptoms
It is common to have no symptoms but, if present, they may include a watery, grey discharge and a fishy odour.

Diagnosis
BV is diagnosed by examination of a sample of vaginal fluid under a microscope.

Causes of BV
The exact cause of BV is not known, but it is found more commonly in women who are sexually active. BV may appear shortly after a change of sexual partner, and other sexually transmitted diseases are often found to be present.

Treatment
Treatment is with antibiotic tablets.
BV is only treated when there are obvious symptoms, if you are about to have a medical procedure such as IUCD insertion or a gynaecological procedure, or in some situations during pregnancy.
Candidiasis

Candidiasis, or thrush, is caused by an overgrowth of a yeast (a type of fungus) called Candida. It is not caught or transferred by sexual activity. 80% of women will have thrush at some stage of their life, and most women will develop thrush without any identifiable cause. However, antibiotics, pregnancy and some medical conditions such as diabetes, can cause thrush to occur. Symptoms The main symptoms for women are itching and irritation of the vulval skin and vagina. There may be a thick, white vaginal discharge and discomfort with sex and when urinating. Symptoms may be worse the week before menstruation, or made worse by having sex. Men may notice itching, redness, and white discharge on the head of the penis and the foreskin. Diagnosis Diagnosis is made from a combination of symptoms, examination findings and specific cultures for Candida. Treatment Candidiasis may be treated with an antifungal medication, usually in the form of vaginal creams or pessaries. Partners only need to be treated if they have symptoms.

Candidiasis, or thrush, is caused by an overgrowth of a yeast (a type of fungus) called Candida. It is not caught or transferred by sexual activity.
80% of women will have thrush at some stage of their life, and most women will develop thrush without any identifiable cause. However, antibiotics, pregnancy and some medical conditions such as diabetes, can cause thrush to occur.

Symptoms

The main symptoms for women are itching and irritation of the vulval skin and vagina. There may be a thick, white vaginal discharge and discomfort with sex and when urinating. Symptoms may be worse the week before menstruation, or made worse by having sex.
Men may notice itching, redness, and white discharge on the head of the penis and the foreskin.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is made from a combination of symptoms, examination findings and specific cultures for Candida.

Treatment

Candidiasis may be treated with an antifungal medication, usually in the form of vaginal creams or pessaries. Partners only need to be treated if they have symptoms.
Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a very common infection of the mucous membranes (linings) of the male urethra, female cervix and sometimes the eye, rectum or throat. Chlamydia is transmitted by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with an infected partner. A mother may pass the infection on to her baby at birth, causing the baby to develop eye or lung infections. Symptoms Most women will not develop symptoms, but can still pass it on to others. Possible symptoms in women include: lower abdominal pain, abnormal vaginal bleeding, pain when passing urine, or altered vaginal secretions. Men may have a discharge, experience painful urination, penile irritation or testicular pain. About 25% of men have no symptoms, but can still pass it on. In both men and women, the infection can remain for months or years if untreated. Diagnosis Chlamydia testing is done by swab or urine sample. Treatment Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics. Sexual partners should have a sexual health check and treatment for Chlamydia even if they have no symptoms and even if they have a negative test result.

Chlamydia is a very common infection of the mucous membranes (linings) of the male urethra, female cervix and sometimes the eye, rectum or throat.
Chlamydia is transmitted by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with an infected partner. A mother may pass the infection on to her baby at birth, causing the baby to develop eye or lung infections.

Symptoms

Most women will not develop symptoms, but can still pass it on to others. Possible symptoms in women include: lower abdominal pain, abnormal vaginal bleeding, pain when passing urine, or altered vaginal secretions.
Men may have a discharge, experience painful urination, penile irritation or testicular pain.  About 25% of men have no symptoms, but can still pass it on. In both men and women, the infection can remain for months or years if untreated.

Diagnosis
Chlamydia testing is done by swab or urine sample.

Treatment
Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics. Sexual partners should have a sexual health check and treatment for Chlamydia even if they have no symptoms and even if they have a negative test result.
Crabs (pubic lice)

Crabs are very small insects which can infect the genital skin and cause itching. Crabs are not the same as the lice found in the scalp. Crab lice are common and can be transmitted by close bodily contact. Symptoms The main symptom of crabs is itching in the genital area. Sometimes it is possible to see them in the pubic hair. Treatment Pubic lice shampoo can be bought over-the-counter at pharmacies. Sexual partners should also be treated. Bedding and clothing should be machine washed or removed from body contact for 72 hours.

Crabs are very small insects which can infect the genital skin and cause itching. Crabs are not the same as the lice found in the scalp.
Crab lice are common and can be transmitted by close bodily contact.

Symptoms
The main symptom of crabs is itching in the genital area. Sometimes it is possible to see them in the pubic hair.

Treatment
Pubic lice shampoo can be bought over-the-counter at pharmacies. Sexual partners should also be treated.
Bedding and clothing should be machine washed or removed from body contact for 72 hours.
Cystitis

Cystitis is inflammation of the bladder, usually caused by a bacterial infection. Cystitis is not sexually transmitted but sexual activity may trigger cystitis in some women. Symptoms The symptoms of cystitis may include: A burning feeling when passing urine Increased frequency of urination and urgency to pass urine Passing small amounts of urine Strong smelling urine Lower abdominal pain. Diagnosis Diagnosis is made by testing the urine for bacteria. Treatment Cystitis is treated with a course of antibiotics.

Cystitis is inflammation of the bladder, usually caused by a bacterial infection. Cystitis is not sexually transmitted but sexual activity may trigger cystitis in some women. 

Symptoms

The symptoms of cystitis may include:

  • A burning feeling when passing urine
  • Increased frequency of urination and urgency to pass urine
  • Passing small amounts of urine 
  • Strong smelling urine
  • Lower abdominal pain.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is made by testing the urine for bacteria.

Treatment

Cystitis is treated with a course of antibiotics.

Genital Herpes

Genital herpes is a common infection caused by a virus called herpes simplex. You can get genital herpes by having genital skin contact with someone who has the infection. Most transmission occurs when herpes blisters or sores are not present. This can happen in two ways: People who have recurrent (repeated episodes of) genital herpes can transmit the virus at the time of or between recurrences. Many people exposed to the virus never develop any signs or symptoms of the infection but may transmit the virus to their sexual partner. Symptoms Herpes affects different people in different ways. Following exposure, some individuals will develop symptoms within two to fourteen days. However, most people have mild or no clinical symptoms of herpes. The symptoms of the first episode of genital herpes may include a flu-like illness, swollen glands in the groin, pain and blisters in the genital area and pain on urinating. The entire episode can last from ten days to one month and will generally heal without any long term problems. Subsequent episodes can vary from one or two to twelve or more episodes a year but generally last only a few days. The symptoms are usually minor, consisting of pain or tingling. Diagnosis The best way of confirming a diagnosis is to go to your doctor when blisters or sores are present. A specimen will be taken from one of the sores or blisters and sent to the laboratory. Your doctor may also recommend tests to rule out other sexually transmissible infections. Treatment Try to keep the area clean and dry. Bathing affected areas with a diluted salt solution two or three times a day can provide relief. If the pain is severe, aspirin or paracetamol may be helpful. Antiviral drugs are available that help to manage genital herpes. Pregnancy and the newborn Occasionally, babies will become infected with herpes, but this is rare. It’s important to see your doctor if you have recurrent genital herpes and are thinking of becoming pregnant or are already pregnant, or if you’re pregnant and develop herpes for the first time. For further information, please click on the link to visit the New Zealand Herpes Foundation website.

Genital herpes is a common infection caused by a virus called herpes simplex. You can get genital herpes by having genital skin contact  with someone who has the infection. Most transmission occurs when herpes blisters or sores are not present. This can happen in two ways:
  • People who have recurrent (repeated episodes of) genital herpes can transmit the virus at the time of or between recurrences.
  • Many people exposed to the virus never develop any signs or symptoms of the infection but may transmit the virus to their sexual partner.
Symptoms
Herpes affects different people in different ways. Following exposure, some individuals will develop symptoms within two to fourteen days. However, most people have mild or no clinical symptoms of herpes.
The symptoms of the first episode of genital herpes may include a flu-like illness, swollen glands in the groin, pain and blisters in the genital area and pain on urinating. The entire episode can last from ten days to one month and will generally heal without any long term problems.

Subsequent episodes can vary from one or two to twelve or more episodes a year but generally last only a few days. The symptoms are usually minor, consisting of pain or tingling.
Diagnosis
The best way of confirming a diagnosis is to go to your doctor when blisters or sores are present. A specimen will be taken from one of the sores or blisters and sent to the laboratory. Your doctor may also recommend tests to rule out other sexually transmissible infections.
Treatment

Try to keep the area clean and dry. Bathing affected areas with a diluted salt solution two or three times a day can provide relief. If the pain is severe, aspirin or paracetamol may be helpful.
Antiviral drugs are available that help to manage genital herpes.

Pregnancy and the newborn

Occasionally, babies will become infected with herpes, but this is rare. It’s important to see your doctor if you have recurrent genital herpes and are thinking of becoming pregnant or are already pregnant, or if you’re pregnant and develop herpes for the first time.

 

For further information, please click on the link to visit the New Zealand Herpes Foundation website.

 
Genital Warts

Genital warts are caused by infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). Most people who have genital HPV infection do not have any symptoms, but those who do have symptoms develop genital lumps. The types of HPV affecting the genital area are different from those causing warts on the hands or other areas of the body. HPV is transmitted by genital skin contact with an infected sexual partner. Diagnosis The diagnosis is made by the presence of warts on the genital skin. Treatment Genital warts can be removed by freezing, applying medication or burning with electrical heat or laser. Don’t use over-the-counter treatments for warts on sensitive genital skin. Removal of the warts does not mean the virus is removed. It will remain in the skin for months to years, and the warts may recur.

Genital warts are caused by infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). Most people who have genital HPV infection do not have any symptoms, but those who do have symptoms develop genital lumps.
The types of HPV affecting the genital area are different from those causing warts on the hands or other areas of the body.
HPV is transmitted by genital skin contact with an infected sexual partner.

Diagnosis

The diagnosis is made by the presence of warts on the genital skin.  

Treatment

Genital warts can be removed by freezing, applying medication or burning with electrical heat or laser. Don’t use over-the-counter treatments for warts on sensitive genital skin.

Removal of the warts does not mean the virus is removed. It will remain in the skin for months to years, and the warts may recur.

Gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea is caused by a bacterial infection of the mucous membranes (linings) of the male urethra, female cervix and sometimes the eye, rectum or throat. Gonorrhoea is transmitted by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has the infection. An infected mother can pass the infection on to her baby at birth. Symptoms Women often do not develop symptoms but can still pass on the infection. Possible symptoms include vaginal discharge, pelvic pain or abnormal bleeding. Men with urethral infection may experience urethral discharge, urethral irritation, or pain on urinating. Infection in the rectum or throat does not usually cause symptoms. Diagnosis Testing for gonorrhoea is done by swabs taken from the cervix in women and from the urethra in men. Treatment Gonorrhoea is treated with antibiotics. Sexual partners should have a sexual health check and treatment even if they have no symptoms and even if they have a negative test result.

Gonorrhoea is caused by a bacterial infection of the mucous membranes (linings) of the male urethra, female cervix and sometimes the eye, rectum or throat.
Gonorrhoea is transmitted by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has the infection.
An infected mother can pass the infection on to her baby at birth.

Symptoms
Women often do not develop symptoms but can still pass on the infection. Possible symptoms include vaginal discharge, pelvic pain or abnormal bleeding.
Men with urethral infection may experience urethral discharge, urethral irritation, or pain on urinating.
Infection in the rectum or throat does not usually cause symptoms.

Diagnosis
Testing for gonorrhoea is done by swabs taken from the cervix in women and from the urethra in men.

Treatment
Gonorrhoea is treated with antibiotics. Sexual partners should have a sexual health check and treatment even if they have no symptoms and even if they have a negative test result.
Molluscum Contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus and is seen as small lumps with waxy, white centres. They are commonly found on the genital area, thighs or lower abdomen. Molluscum contagiosum is spread by close bodily contact, and in adults this is usually sexual contact. Symptoms Molluscum contagiosum is usually painless but can sometimes cause itching. The condition usually resolves within 12 - 18 months. Treatment Molluscum can be removed by freezing or burning or removing the central core of the lesion.

Molluscum contagiosum is caused by a virus and is seen as small lumps with waxy, white centres. They are commonly found on the genital area, thighs or lower abdomen.
Molluscum contagiosum is spread by close bodily contact, and in adults this is usually sexual contact.

Symptoms

Molluscum contagiosum is usually painless but can sometimes cause itching. The condition usually resolves within 12 - 18 months.

Treatment
Molluscum can be removed by freezing or burning or removing the central core of the lesion.
Syphilis

Syphilis is an uncommon disease in New Zealand but one that can be very serious if left untreated. Syphilis is almost always acquired by sexual contact with an infected person. Symptoms Many people do not have any symptoms of infection, but those who do may experience a painless genital ulcer, swellings in the groin, or a body rash. Often these symptoms will resolve and the infection may not cause any further problems. However, if untreated, the infection may remain active for many years and can cause damage to the brain, heart, internal organs, and skin. Diagnosis Diagnosis is by a blood test or tests taken from the genital ulcer or rash. Treatment Treatment is with antibiotics, usually given by injection. Sexual partners should be tested and treated also. Pregnancy A pregnant woman who has syphilis can cause damage to the baby and cause the baby to be born with syphilis. Effective treatment of the mother during the pregnancy will prevent the baby being born with syphilis.

Syphilis is an uncommon disease in New Zealand but one that can be very serious if left untreated. Syphilis is almost always acquired by sexual contact with an infected person.

Symptoms

Many people do not have any symptoms of infection, but those who do may experience a painless genital ulcer, swellings in the groin, or a body rash. Often these symptoms will resolve and the infection may not cause any further problems. However, if untreated, the infection may remain active for many years and can cause damage to the brain, heart, internal organs, and skin.  

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is by a blood test or tests taken from the genital ulcer or rash.

Treatment
Treatment is with antibiotics, usually given by injection. Sexual partners should be tested and treated also.


Pregnancy
 
A pregnant woman who has syphilis can cause damage to the baby and cause the baby to be born with syphilis. Effective treatment of the mother during the pregnancy will prevent the baby being born with syphilis.
Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis is caused by a small parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. The infection is acquired through sexual contact with an infected person. Symptoms Symptoms usually develop 1-4 weeks after contact, but some women do not have symptoms. In females symptoms include vaginal discharge which is greenish, frothy and watery with an unpleasant smell. The skin around the vagina and vulva can be uncomfortable, hot and swollen with redness and inflammation that can extend onto the upper thighs. Itching or pain when urinating can also occur. In males it can cause a discharge from the penis and discomfort when urinating. However, men usually don’t have symptoms of infection. Diagnosis A swab of vaginal fluid can be sent to a laboratory where the organism can be detected by culture or other methods. Trichomonas in males is very difficult to identify. Male partners of infected females should always be treated. Treatment Trichomoniasis is treated with a course of antibiotic tablets.

Trichomoniasis is caused by a small parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. The infection is acquired through sexual contact with an infected person.

Symptoms

Symptoms usually develop 1-4 weeks after contact, but some women do not have symptoms. 
In females symptoms include vaginal discharge which is greenish, frothy and watery with an unpleasant smell. The skin around the vagina and vulva can be uncomfortable, hot and swollen with redness and inflammation that can extend onto the upper thighs. Itching or pain when urinating can also occur.
In males it can cause a discharge from the penis and discomfort when urinating. However, men usually don’t have symptoms of infection.  

Diagnosis

A swab of vaginal fluid can be sent to a laboratory where the organism can be detected by culture or other methods.
Trichomonas in males is very difficult to identify. Male partners of infected females should always be treated.

Treatment
Trichomoniasis is treated with a course of antibiotic tablets.
Urethritis

Urethritis is the term used to describe an inflamed urethra. If tests for gonorrhoea and Chlamydia are negative, then the urethritis is usually called non-specific urethritis (NSU). Urethritis can occur after unprotected vaginal, anal and oral sex. Symptoms Symptoms of urethritis include discharge, pain passing urine, or just an uncomfortable feeling in the urethra. Diagnosis A swab from the urethra and a urine sample are taken for gonorrhoea and Chlamydia. The test is more accurate if you do not pass urine for at least 2 hours beforehand. Treatment Treatment is with antibiotic tablets. Sexual partners also need assessment and treatment even if your results for Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are negative.

Urethritis is the term used to describe an inflamed urethra. If tests for gonorrhoea and Chlamydia are negative, then the urethritis is usually called non-specific urethritis (NSU).
Urethritis can occur after unprotected vaginal, anal and oral sex.

Symptoms
Symptoms of urethritis include discharge, pain passing urine, or just an uncomfortable feeling in the urethra.

Diagnosis
A swab from the urethra and a urine sample are taken for gonorrhoea and Chlamydia. The test is more accurate if you do not pass urine for at least 2 hours beforehand.

Treatment
Treatment is with antibiotic tablets. Sexual partners also need assessment and treatment even if your results for Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are negative.

Public Transport

Visit the AT website on (09) 366 6400 or 0800 10 30 80 if you're within the Auckland areas but outside the Auckland free calling area - e.g. Hibiscus Coast, Pukekohe/Waiuku area etc.

Get directions

Other

 

Pohutukawa Clinic : Adult Sexual Assault Service

Dr Anne Laking - Service Lead Clinician

M Forens Med 2019; FFSRH 2019

Ext: 27987

 Tel: (09) 630 9772    (09) 3074949 Ext: 27775

Email: 

Referral Phone: 021 893 532 

Senior Medical Officers  
Dr Christine Foley             Ext: 26579
Dr Joanna Lambert           Ext: 27788
Dr Connie Juhn                 Ext 27784
Dr Susan Reader               Ext 27784
Medical Officers
Dr Courtney Schauer Ext 27784

Clinical Nurse Specialists 

Jane Campbell Claire Caiger
Nadia Gozon Catherine Coop

Team Support Administrator 

Shehara Farik
Operations Manager
SheharaF@adhb.govt.nz
021 391 581
 

Medical Officers

Dr H.Patel  (09) 3074949 Ext: 27758
 

Registrars  

Dr Vanessa Ng

(09) 3074949 Ext 26377

Dr Eva Gregory  021792490
 

 TRANSGENDER HEALTH CARE KEY WORKER

Nora Purdie

021589519 

(09) 3074949 Ext: 27789 

 
Clinical  Psychologist
Emma Reynolds

0212228764

Em Edwards

021834558

 

Management  / Support Staff 

Sook Ping 

Team Support Administrator

(09) 3074949 ext:27782

Shehara Farik

SheharaF@adhb.govt.nz

 

Operations Manager – Specialist Outpatient Services Community and Long Term Conditions Directorate

021 391 581

 

 
NZ Prostitutes Collective             

Clinical Nurse Specialists

 Tel: (09) 366 6106  
Suzanne Werder
Delvene Steven

  

Peer Sexuality Support Service    

Team Coordinator – Education Unit

 SAMORA KAKE

Mob: 021 457 405

Tel: (09) 630 9786 Ext: 27778 ,27785,27786   
ARSHeducationunite@adhb.govt.nz

Website

Contact Details

This page was last updated at 11:07AM on February 7, 2024. This information is reviewed and edited by Sexual Health Service | Auckland | Te Toka Tumai | Te Whatu Ora.