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Anju Basu - Wellington Gynaecologist

Private Service, Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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Description

Anju is a New Zealand trained gynaecologist specialising in advanced laparoscopic and da Vinci robotic-assisted surgery for complex benign gynaecological conditions. Anju has an interest and expertise in laparoscopic and robotic-assisted surgery for removal of large fibroids, difficult hysterectomy, severe endometriosis and complex pelvic floor surgery.

Her focus is on a well informed patient. Doctor-patient communication is the first step to good health. Anju spends time with patients to individualise their care plan. She combines excellent surgical training and cutting edge technology to optimise patient outcomes. Anju keeps herself updated with advances in her field and participates in an international surgical audit to provide the best care and monitor outcomes.

Anju works in close collaboration with a urologist, colorectal surgeon and pelvic floor physiotherapist to provide a comprehensive and complete care for women with complex pelvic floor problems.

Anju provides care for a wide range of gynaecological problems including:
  • Pelvic Pain, Endometriosis
  • Laparoscopic treatment of Endometriosis
  • Robotic-assisted Hysterectomy
  • Laparoscopic Hysterectomy
  • Laparoscopic Myomectomy
  • Postmenopausal bleeding
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Menstrual disorders
  • Colposcopy and treatment for abnormal cervical smears
  • Fibroids
  • Ovarian cysts
  • Labioplasty
  • Laparoscopic and Hysteroscopic surgery for the treatment of various gynaecological conditions
  • Offers MonaLisa Touch treatment as an alternative option for genitourinary symptoms of menopause

 

What is Gynaecology?
Gynaecology is the area of medicine that deals with health issues and conditions that are specific to women. This generally includes the female reproductive organs and genitalia. The reproductive organs consist of the ovaries that release an egg every month, the fallopian tubes that lead from the ovaries, the uterus (womb), which is where a baby will grow if the egg is fertilised during sexual intercourse, the cervix (opening of the uterus) and the vagina.

Urogynaecology and minimally invasive surgery are my special areas of interest. This includes:

  • Vaginal prolapse
  • Urinary incontinence and other bladder control issues
  • Laparoscopic treatment of Endometriosis
  • Robotic-assisted Hysterectomy
  • Laparoscopic Myomectomy
  • Laparoscopic Hysterectomy
  • Laparoscopic Ovarian Cystectomy
  • Laparoscopic Sacrocolpopexy
  • Endometrial ablation
  • Hysteroscopic resection of fibroids etc.

 
Laparoscopy
Many gynaecological investigations and treatments are performed by laparoscopy. This is a procedure to view the inside of the abdomen and pelvis through a specially lit type of mini telescope (laparoscope) that is inserted through a small cut in the abdomen. The laparoscope also contains a small camera that sends pictures to a screen that the doctor can watch.

Surgical procedures (keyhole surgery) can be performed at the same time. A laparoscopy is performed under a general anaesthetic (you are asleep).

Staff

Rachel Hyde: Registered Nurse/Practice Manager
Ruth: Registered Nurse

Melisa O'Regan: Administrative Assistant

Consultants

  • Dr Anju Basu

    Gynaecologist: Laparoscopic and Robotic Surgeon

Referral Expectations

A referral from your GP for any new gynaecology appointment is required. Your GP will know how to send this.

A referral allows you to be appropriately triaged for an appointment and appropriate investigations can be initiated prior to appointment. This means treatment can be started in a timely manner.

If you have previously been seen for the same problem and want to be seen directly without a referral please speak to the nurse at Wakefield Specialist Centre on 021606854. A discussion with the nurse allows your appointment to be prioritised, tests done prior to appointment and sometimes you may be asked to see your GP first.

Charges

Affiliated Provider for consultation and room based procedures with Southern Cross Health insurance. This means our office organises prior approval on behalf of the patient and claims directly from the insurance company - taking the burden off the patient.

Affiliated Provider for robotic-assisted hysterectomy with Southern Cross Health insurance. This means our office applies for prior approval for surgery directly.

On preferred provider list for NIB.

Hours

Mon – Fri 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Please contact Mel on 048898458 for available appointments. I work full time in private practice. We require a referral from your GP.

Languages Spoken

English, Bengali, Hindi, Punjabi

Common Conditions / Procedures / Treatments

Endometriosis

The endometrium is the name of the tissue that lines your uterus (womb). Endometriosis is a condition where tissue, like the endometrium, grows in other parts of the body. Usually these growths occur inside the pelvic cavity in places such as the ovaries, bowel, or a lining of the pelvic cavity and abdomen called the peritoneum. Each month, as the endometrial lining of the uterus builds up with blood that will be lost during your period, these other growths of endometrial tissue get bigger and can bleed and cause inflammation and adhesions (internal scarring). Some women with this condition do not have many symptoms, whereas others suffer severe pain and problems such as infertility and tiredness. Diagnosis is made by laparoscopy and surgical treatment is usually performed at the same time. Medical treatment can be used to control the pain and inflammation.

The endometrium is the name of the tissue that lines your uterus (womb). Endometriosis is a condition where tissue, like the endometrium, grows in other parts of the body. Usually these growths occur inside the pelvic cavity in places such as the ovaries, bowel, or a lining of the pelvic cavity and abdomen called the peritoneum. Each month, as the endometrial lining of the uterus builds up with blood that will be lost during your period, these other growths of endometrial tissue get bigger and can bleed and cause inflammation and adhesions (internal scarring).
 
Some women with this condition do not have many symptoms, whereas others suffer severe pain and problems such as infertility and tiredness.
 
Diagnosis is made by laparoscopy and surgical treatment is usually performed at the  same time. Medical treatment can be used to control the pain and inflammation.
Bladder Sling Procedures

Sling procedures are common surgical operations to stop stress incontinence. This is a condition where urine leaks out when movements, such as coughing, laughing or sneezing put pressure on the bladder. Stress incontinence occurs when the muscles supporting the urethra (tube that carries the urine out of the body) become weak and the urethra no longer works well as a valve to keep the urine in the bladder. Sometimes this results from the effects of childbirth. Sling procedures provide support to the weakened muscles by placing a stitch or strip of mesh under the urethra so that it won’t accidentally release urine when there is pressure on the bladder. Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) Procedure In tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) surgery, a mesh-like tape is placed under the urethra to give it support. The TVT procedure is done through small cuts in the vagina and in your pubic area or upper thighs. It is usually performed under general anaesthetic. Burch Procedure In the Burch procedure, permanent stitches are placed on both sides of the urethra to give it more support. The Burch procedure is done under a general anaesthetic (you sleep throughout the procedure) and can be performed by laparoscopic surgery. Mid Urethral Slings.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 1.2 MB) TVT / TVT O

Sling procedures are common surgical operations to stop stress incontinence. This is a condition where urine leaks out when movements, such as coughing, laughing or sneezing put pressure on the bladder. Stress incontinence occurs when the muscles supporting the urethra (tube that carries the urine out of the body) become weak and the urethra no longer works well as a valve to keep the urine in the bladder. Sometimes this results from the effects of childbirth. Sling procedures provide support to the weakened muscles by placing a stitch or strip of mesh under the urethra so that it won’t accidentally release urine when there is pressure on the bladder.

 

Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) Procedure
In tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) surgery, a mesh-like tape is placed under the urethra to give it support. The TVT procedure is done through small cuts in the vagina and in your pubic area or upper thighs. It is usually performed under general anaesthetic.
Burch Procedure
In the Burch procedure, permanent stitches are placed on both sides of the urethra to give it more support. The Burch procedure is done under a general anaesthetic (you sleep throughout the procedure) and can be performed by laparoscopic surgery.
 
Uterine or Vaginal Prolapse

If the uterus (womb) or vagina slips out of position, this is referred to as a prolapse. It is caused when the supporting muscles and connective tissue become weak, allowing a part of the uterus or vagina to bulge. Pregnancy and childbirth is the most common reason. Symptoms include pain, heaviness in the vagina, frequent need to pass urine, strong urges to pass urine, incomplete emptying of urine or bowels, urinary incontinence etc. In mild cases, pelvic floor physiotherapy may help improve the symptoms, but women with more severe prolapses may need to have surgery. Vaginal mesh is no longer used in surgery for prolapse. Vaginal pessaries can also be a conservative option. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important adjunct to whatever treatment option you may choose. Pelvic Organ Prolapse.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 455.4 KB) Anterior Vaginal Repair.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 339.4 KB) Posterior Vaginal Repair.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 331.4 KB) Sacrocolpopexy.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 321.8 KB) Vaginal Hysterectomy and Repair.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 444.5 KB) Understanding and Managing Constipation.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 340.3 KB) Sacrospinous Colpopexy.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 694.1 KB)

If the uterus (womb) or vagina slips out of position, this is referred to as a prolapse. It is caused when the supporting muscles and connective tissue become weak, allowing a part of the uterus or vagina to bulge.
 
Pregnancy and childbirth is the most common reason. Symptoms include pain, heaviness in the vagina, frequent need to pass urine, strong urges to pass urine, incomplete emptying of urine or bowels, urinary incontinence etc.
 
In mild cases, pelvic floor physiotherapy may help improve the symptoms, but women with more severe prolapses may need to have surgery. Vaginal mesh is no longer used in surgery for prolapse. Vaginal pessaries can also be a conservative option. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important adjunct to whatever treatment option you may choose.
Hysterectomy

A hysterectomy is an operation to remove your uterus (womb). Some types of hysterectomies include the removal of other organs as well, and this will depend on the reason for the operation. A hysterectomy is a treatment for many different diseases and conditions and it can be done through the vagina, laparoscopically (keyhole) or through a cut in the abdomen. Robotic Surgery.docx.docx.docx (DOCX, 16.6 KB) Robotic-assisted surgery

A hysterectomy is an operation to remove your uterus (womb). Some types of hysterectomies include the removal of other organs as well, and this will depend on the reason for the operation. A hysterectomy is a treatment for many different diseases and conditions and it can be done through the vagina, laparoscopically (keyhole) or through a cut in the abdomen.
Fibroids

Fibroids are generally noncancerous growths or tumours from the muscular part of the uterus (womb); sometimes they are also called myomas. Fibroids may be very small (about 5mm) or can grow to be quite large (about 100mm). Many women with fibroids do not notice any symptoms and will not need treatment, whereas others may experience problems such as painful and heavy periods, pressure symptoms of bladder and bowel. Treatment includes surgical removal which in some cases can be done laparoscopically. Sometimes medication is prescribed to shrink the fibroids' size. Uterine Fibroids.docx.docx.docx.docx.docx.docx (DOCX, 46.1 KB) Uterine Fibroids

Fibroids are generally noncancerous growths or tumours from the muscular part of the uterus (womb); sometimes they are also called myomas. Fibroids may be very small (about 5mm) or can grow to be quite large (about 100mm).
 
Many women with fibroids do not notice any symptoms and will not need treatment, whereas others may experience problems such as painful and heavy periods, pressure symptoms of bladder and bowel. Treatment includes surgical removal which in some cases can be done laparoscopically. Sometimes medication is prescribed to shrink the fibroids' size.
Ovarian Cysts

An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac or pouch in the ovary. In most cases, the cyst grows as a result of ovulation (when the egg is released from the ovary), and it will usually shrink over time. Sometimes, the ovarian cyst may cause pain. The best way to check for an ovarian cyst is by ultrasound examination, and the treatment will depend on how troublesome the symptoms are. Sometimes it is best to leave the cyst alone and just check it regularly with ultrasound. In other cases it may need to be removed by laparoscopic surgery.

An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac or pouch in the ovary.  In most cases, the cyst grows as a result of ovulation (when the egg is released from the ovary), and it will usually shrink over time. Sometimes, the ovarian cyst may cause pain.
 
The best way to check for an ovarian cyst is by ultrasound examination, and the treatment will depend on how troublesome the symptoms are. Sometimes it is best to leave the cyst alone and just check it regularly with ultrasound. In other cases it may need to be removed by laparoscopic surgery.
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder that can cause you to have a variety of symptoms, including no periods or irregular periods, increased hair growth on the face and body, acne (pimples) and increased bodyweight. PCOS is also one of the main causes of infertility in women. The ovaries of women with PCOS often contain many small cysts (fluid-filled sacs), but this does not seem to be the cause of the condition. For women who have not reached menopause, the most common treatment is the birth control pill, which will regulate your periods. There are also other medicines that can help control the symptoms.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder that can cause you to have a variety of symptoms, including no periods or irregular periods, increased hair growth on the face and body, acne (pimples) and increased bodyweight. PCOS is also one of the main causes of infertility in women. The ovaries of women with PCOS often contain many small cysts (fluid-filled sacs), but this does not seem to be the cause of the condition.
 
For women who have not reached menopause, the most common treatment is the birth control pill, which will regulate your periods. There are also other medicines that can help control the symptoms.
Menstrual Problems

Menstruation is the medical name for your monthly period. This is when blood and tissue from the lining of the uterus (womb) is shed through the vagina and out of the body. Menstruation starts at puberty and it is stimulated by hormones that make a girl’s body able to become pregnant. This usually happens anytime between the ages of 9 and 16 years. Menstruation will recur about every 28 days (the menstrual cycle), unless interrupted by pregnancy, and will stop at menopause, which occurs at about 50 years of age. There are a number of problems that can occur with menstruation ranging from mild to severe. More than half of all women will have cramps (dysmenorrhoea) during the first day or two of their period. Other problems include very heavy or long periods (menorrhagia) or no periods (amenorrhoea).

Menstruation is the medical name for your monthly period. This is when blood and tissue from the lining of the uterus (womb) is shed through the vagina and out of the body.
 
Menstruation starts at puberty and it is stimulated by hormones that make a girl’s body able to become pregnant. This usually happens anytime between the ages of 9 and 16 years. Menstruation will recur about every 28 days (the menstrual cycle), unless interrupted by pregnancy, and will stop at menopause, which occurs at about 50 years of age.
 
There are a number of problems that can occur with menstruation ranging from mild to severe. More than half of all women will have cramps (dysmenorrhoea) during the first day or two of their period. Other problems include very heavy or long periods (menorrhagia) or no periods (amenorrhoea).
Endometrial Ablation

The endometrium is the lining of your uterus (womb). Endometrial ablation is the surgical removal or destruction of this lining. There are different methods of destroying the endometrium including electricity, radio frequency energy, laser therapy or freezing. A specialist performs the operation and it is done through the vagina, so there are no cuts on the abdomen. The endometrium will heal leaving scarring, which usually reduces or stops menstrual periods. In women who have very heavy periods (menorrhagia), an endometrial ablation can be done instead of a hysterectomy as it is an easier procedure than a hysterectomy and is quicker to recover from. Endometrial ablation is only performed in women who no longer wish to have children.

The endometrium is the lining of your uterus (womb). Endometrial ablation is the surgical removal or destruction of this lining. There are different methods of destroying the endometrium including electricity, radio frequency energy, laser therapy or freezing.
 
A specialist performs the operation and it is done through the vagina, so there are no cuts on the abdomen. The endometrium will heal leaving scarring, which usually reduces or stops menstrual periods.
 
In women who have very heavy periods (menorrhagia), an endometrial ablation can be done instead of a hysterectomy as it is an easier procedure than a hysterectomy and is quicker to recover from. Endometrial ablation is only performed in women who no longer wish to have children.
Cervical Dysplasia

Cervical dysplasia is the growth of abnormal cells around the cervix (entrance to the uterus). Although this condition is not cancer there is a small risk that these cells could become cancerous. Sometimes no treatment is needed as the condition may improve by itself. For more severe dysplasia, treatment involves removing the abnormal cells by freezing, laser therapy (a tiny beam of light) or electrical burning. Whether you have treatment or not, you should have more frequent Pap smears in the future.

Cervical dysplasia is the growth of abnormal cells around the cervix (entrance to the uterus). Although this condition is not cancer there is a small risk that these cells could become cancerous.

Sometimes no treatment is needed as the condition may improve by itself. For more severe dysplasia, treatment involves removing the abnormal cells by freezing, laser therapy (a tiny beam of light) or electrical burning. Whether you have treatment or not, you should have more frequent Pap smears in the future.

Pap Smear

A Pap smear is a test to check for signs of cancer on the cervix (entrance to the uterus). A doctor will put an instrument called a speculum into the vagina to open it, and then gently wipe or brush a few cells from the cervix to send to the laboratory for testing. A Pap smear can show if cervical cells are going through any changes that happen before cancer grows. It will also show if cancer cells are present. Regular Pap smears make it possible to prevent cancer before it grows, or to pick up the cancer early so that it is more easily cured. A National Cervical Screening Programme aims to provide all New Zealand women with regular smears and recommends that a Pap smear be done every three years between the ages of 20 and 70 years.

A Pap smear is a test to check for signs of cancer on the cervix (entrance to the uterus). A doctor will put an instrument called a speculum into the vagina to open it, and then gently wipe or brush a few cells from the cervix to send to the laboratory for testing. A Pap smear can show if cervical cells are going through any changes that happen before cancer grows. It will also show if cancer cells are present.
 
Regular Pap smears make it possible to prevent cancer before it grows, or to pick up the cancer early so that it is more easily cured. A National Cervical Screening Programme aims to provide all New Zealand women with regular smears and recommends that a Pap smear be done every three years between the ages of 20 and 70 years.
Colposcopy

A colposcopy is a detailed examination of the cervix (entrance to the uterus) with a specially lit microscope (colposcope). As with a Pap smear, an instrument called a speculum is inserted into the vagina, and then the colposcope is positioned outside the vagina with its light directed on the cervix. A specialist will perform a colposcopy if your Pap smear has shown abnormal or cancerous cells on the cervix. During the colposcopy further samples of tissue (biopsies) are usually removed and examined in the laboratory so the doctor can get a clearer idea of the extent of the abnormal cells.

A colposcopy is a detailed examination of the cervix (entrance to the uterus) with a specially lit microscope (colposcope). As with a Pap smear, an instrument called a speculum is inserted into the vagina, and then the colposcope is positioned outside the vagina with its light directed on the cervix.
 
A specialist will perform a colposcopy if your Pap smear has shown abnormal or cancerous cells on the cervix. During the colposcopy further samples of tissue (biopsies) are usually removed and examined in the laboratory so the doctor can get a clearer idea of the extent of the abnormal cells.
Oophorectomy

An oophorectomy is an operation to remove one or both ovaries. It is done for many reasons including ovarian cancer, ovarian cysts or to remove the source of the hormone oestrogen that is produced by the ovaries and can stimulate some cancers. If both ovaries are removed, your periods will stop and you will not be able to have children. Sometimes an oophorectomy is done together with a hysterectomy.

An oophorectomy is an operation to remove one or both ovaries. It is done for many reasons including ovarian cancer, ovarian cysts or to remove the source of the hormone oestrogen that is produced by the ovaries and can stimulate some cancers. If both ovaries are removed, your periods will stop and you will not be able to have children. Sometimes an oophorectomy is done together with a hysterectomy.
Hysteroscopy and Dilatation and Curettage (D&C)

This is an operation where the cervix (entrance to the uterus) is dilated and a hysteroscope (small lighted mini telescope) is inserted into the uterus through the vagina and cervix so the specialist can see the inside of the uterus. If no cancer is present, a small spoon-like instrument with a long handle, called a curette, is inserted and the lining of the uterus is scraped off and sent to the laboratory for examination. This procedure can be done under a general (you are asleep) or local (you are awake but the area being investigated is numb) anaesthetic.

This is an operation where the cervix (entrance to the uterus) is dilated and a hysteroscope (small lighted mini telescope) is inserted into the uterus through the vagina and cervix so the specialist can see the inside of the uterus. If no cancer is present, a small spoon-like instrument with a long handle, called a curette, is inserted and the lining of the uterus is scraped off and sent to the laboratory for examination.
 
This procedure can be done under a general (you are asleep) or local (you are awake but the area being investigated is numb) anaesthetic.
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Many women experience feelings of tension, anger, fatigue and depression just before and during the first days of their menstrual period. This is called premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and is probably caused by the change in hormone levels. In most women with PMS, symptoms will not be severe enough to require treatment, but some will need to discuss their symptoms with a doctor. Sometimes symptoms can be improved by avoiding some types of food, such as coffee and foods high in salt.

Many women experience feelings of tension, anger, fatigue and depression just before and during the first days of their menstrual period. This is called premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and is probably caused by the change in hormone levels.
 
In most women with PMS, symptoms will not be severe enough to require treatment, but some will need to discuss their symptoms with a doctor. Sometimes symptoms can be improved by avoiding some types of food, such as coffee and foods high in salt.
Vaginal Infections

The most common vaginal infections are yeast infections (also called candidiasis or thrush), trichomoniasis, or bacterial infections (also called bacterial vaginosis). Symptoms of an infection may include irritation, itching, discharge and odour. To make a diagnosis a doctor will usually do a vaginal swab, which involves wiping a type of cotton bud gently across the infected area. The swab is then sent to the laboratory for analysis. There are many medicines that can successfully treat these infections.

The most common vaginal infections are yeast infections (also called candidiasis or thrush), trichomoniasis, or bacterial infections (also called bacterial vaginosis). Symptoms of an infection may include irritation, itching, discharge and odour.
 
To make a diagnosis a doctor will usually do a vaginal swab, which involves wiping a type of cotton bud gently across the infected area. The swab is then sent to the laboratory for analysis. There are many medicines that can successfully treat these infections.
Menopause

Menopause is also called the “change of life” and is the time when your periods will become irregular and stop. This is a natural process in all women and for most it will occur between the ages of 45 and 55 years. Menopause is brought on by decreasing levels of the hormone oestrogen and this can cause a variety of symptoms, including hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings, sleeping problems, memory problems, depression and vaginal dryness. Some women do not notice any symptoms or they are very mild, whereas others experience more severe problems and should go to their doctor for advice. There are many treatments available to reduce the symptoms associated with menopause and, in some cases, lifestyle changes can also help.

Menopause is also called the “change of life” and is the time when your periods will become irregular and stop. This is a natural process in all women and for most it will occur between the ages of 45 and 55 years.
 
Menopause is brought on by decreasing levels of the hormone oestrogen and this can cause a variety of symptoms, including hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings, sleeping problems, memory problems, depression and vaginal dryness. Some women do not notice any symptoms or they are very mild, whereas others experience more severe problems and should go to their doctor for advice.
 
There are many treatments available to reduce the symptoms associated with menopause and, in some cases, lifestyle changes can also help.
Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is when female hormones (oestrogen by itself or with progesterone) are given to a woman during or after menopause when the production of oestrogen by the ovaries declines. The hormones can be taken as tablets, implants or skin patches. HRT has become less popular in recent years because a large study in the USA found that long-term use of HRT can increase the risk of some serious diseases, such as breast cancer and blood clots. However, for some women, short-term use of HRT (no more than 3–4 years) can provide relief from symptoms caused by having less oestrogen in their bodies, such as hot flushes and loss of bone density. The risks and benefits of HRT should be thoroughly discussed with a doctor before treatment begins.

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is when female hormones (oestrogen by itself or with progesterone) are given to a woman during or after menopause when the production of oestrogen by the ovaries declines. The hormones can be taken as tablets, implants or skin patches.
 
HRT has become less popular in recent years because a large study in the USA found that long-term use of HRT can increase the risk of some serious diseases, such as breast cancer and blood clots. However, for some women, short-term use of HRT (no more than 3–4 years) can provide relief from symptoms caused by having less oestrogen in their bodies, such as hot flushes and loss of bone density.
 
The risks and benefits of HRT should be thoroughly discussed with a doctor before treatment begins.
Infertility

About one in every six couples in New Zealand will experience infertility. This is when they are unable to conceive a baby after one year of trying, or when the woman has been unable to carry a pregnancy to a live birth. In about half of the cases, the cause of infertility is due to a problem with the woman and, in the other half, the problem will be with the man. There are now many treatments available for infertile couples and, in many cases, these treatments will result in a successful pregnancy. Doctors with a special interest and expertise in this area will usually provide the best opportunity for treatment. Local support groups and societies can be of help during the stressful time of having tests and treatment.

About one in every six couples in New Zealand will experience infertility. This is when they are unable to conceive a baby after one year of trying, or when the woman has been unable to carry a pregnancy to a live birth. In about half of the cases, the cause of infertility is due to a problem with the woman and, in the other half, the problem will be with the man.
 
There are now many treatments available for infertile couples and, in many cases, these treatments will result in a successful pregnancy. Doctors with a special interest and expertise in this area will usually provide the best opportunity for treatment. Local support groups and societies can be of help during the stressful time of having tests and treatment.
In Vitro Fertilisation

This is the process of fertilising the woman’s egg with the male’s sperm outside of the woman’s body in the laboratory. This type of treatment is used for many infertile couples. After a successful fertilisation has taken place, the embryos (fertilised eggs) are watched closely until they have developed to an appropriate stage and then they are inserted through the vagina and placed into the uterus (womb). A pregnancy test will be performed about 10 days later to see if a pregnancy is progressing.

This is the process of fertilising the woman’s egg with the male’s sperm outside of the woman’s body in the laboratory. This type of treatment is used for many infertile couples. After a successful fertilisation has taken place, the embryos (fertilised eggs) are watched closely until they have developed to an appropriate stage and then they are inserted through the vagina and placed into the uterus (womb). A pregnancy test will be performed about 10 days later to see if a pregnancy is progressing.
MonaLisa Touch Treatment for Symptoms of Vulvo Vaginal Atrophy
New procedure

Parking

Abundant parking is available at both hospitals.

Contact Details

Wakefield Specialist Centre, 99 Rintoul Street, Newtown, Wellington

Wellington

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Boulcott Specialist Centre, 666 High Street, Lower Hutt

Hutt

More details…

This page was last updated at 1:59PM on June 6, 2023. This information is reviewed and edited by Anju Basu - Wellington Gynaecologist.