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Eye Institute - Auckland

Private Service, Ophthalmology

Today

123 Remuera Road, Remuera

7:30 AM to 6:00 PM.

Northmed, 3 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

19 Delta Avenue, New Lynn, Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

652 Great South Road, Manukau, Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Description

Our talented specialists and advanced technologies make the incredible gift of improved eyesight an everyday reality.

The specialists at Eye Institute, in Auckland, New Zealand, are acknowledged leaders in ophthalmology. Our specialist eye surgeons provide a comprehensive range of surgical and medical eye care services including state-of-the-art cataract surgery, refractive laser assessments, retinal disease management, glaucoma management and on-site vitreoretinal surgery.

Eye Institute is conveniently located in all corners of Auckland (Remuera, North Shore, New Lynn, Manukau). These clinics are a handy option for consultations, post-operative checks and general follow-ups. While the clinics have testing machinery available, complex problems or surgeries may need to be seen at Eye Institute, Remuera premises. Eye Institute also has a Hawke’s Bay and Wellington clinic.

Free brochures are available by request to answer common questions about laser-cataract surgery, laser vision correction surgery and various eye conditions.

Consultants

Note: Please note below that some people are not available at all locations.

  • Dr William Cunningham

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at all locations.

  • Prof Helen Danesh-Meyer

    Ophthalmologist Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera

  • Dr Narme Deva

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at Northmed, 3 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland, 652 Great South Road, Manukau, Auckland

  • Dr Kevin Dunne

    Ophthalmologist

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera

  • Dr Peter Hadden

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera, 19 Delta Avenue, New Lynn, Auckland

  • Dr Sophie Hill

    Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera, 652 Great South Road, Manukau, Auckland

  • Dr Nick Mantell

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera, Northmed, 3 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland

  • Dr Kaliopy Matheos

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera

  • Prof Charles McGhee

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera

  • Dr Jay Meyer

    Ophthalmologist Eye Surgeon

    Available at Northmed, 3 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland

  • Dr Graham Reeves

    Ophthalmologist Eye Surgeon

    Available at 652 Great South Road, Manukau, Auckland

  • Dr Peter Ring

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera

  • Dr Shanu Subbiah

    Ophthalmologist

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera

  • Dr Adam Watson

    Ophthalmologist, Eye Surgeon

    Available at 123 Remuera Road, Remuera, Northmed, 3 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland

Referral Expectations

For all appointments contact (09) 522 2125

Hours

123 Remuera Road, Remuera

7:30 AM to 6:00 PM.

Mon – Fri 7:30 AM – 6:00 PM

We will do our best to accommodate busy working schedules.

Northmed, 3 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Mon – Fri 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

19 Delta Avenue, New Lynn, Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Mon – Fri 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

652 Great South Road, Manukau, Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Mon – Fri 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Procedures / Treatments

Refractive Error: short-sightedness (myopia), long-sightedness (hyperopia) and astigmatism

These conditions cause distance blur. In myopia, the eye has a resting focus at a near distance so that people will be able to see objects clearly at some point close to them, whilst the distance is blurry. Hyperopia also causes distance blur but often does not become noticeable until the eye loses its ability to change focus, frequently in middle age. The loss of focus for near distance (presbyopia or “aged sight”) is also related to a decreased ability to change focus but only affects reading. Astigmatism causes an image to be blurry at all distances, but does not affect clarity of images unless it is severe. An optometrist or ophthalmologist can test for these conditions. Treatment is usually glasses or contact lenses which are only obtainable through an optometrist or dispensing optician. Laser surgery and other corrective surgical techniques can also be used to change the focus of the eye to give clarity of sight in suitable patients. Eye Institute was the first to offer the 100% blade-free IntraLase CustomLASIK ® - the safest Laser Eye Surgery available. They have the most experienced and technically advanced LASIK Laser Eye Surgery facilities in New Zealand. To find out more, free phone 0800 99 2020, email us at or visit our website at www.eyeinstitute.co.nz

These conditions cause distance blur. In myopia, the eye has a resting focus at a near distance so that people will be able to see objects clearly at some point close to them, whilst the distance is blurry. Hyperopia also causes distance blur but often does not become noticeable until the eye loses its ability to change focus, frequently in middle age. The loss of focus for near distance (presbyopia or “aged sight”) is also related to a decreased ability to change focus but only affects reading. Astigmatism causes an image to be blurry at all distances, but does not affect clarity of images unless it is severe. An optometrist or ophthalmologist can test for these conditions. Treatment is usually glasses or contact lenses which are only obtainable through an optometrist or dispensing optician.  Laser surgery and other corrective surgical techniques can also be used to change the focus of the eye to give clarity of sight in suitable patients.

Eye Institute was the first to offer the 100% blade-free IntraLase CustomLASIK ® - the safest Laser Eye Surgery available. They have the most experienced and technically advanced LASIK Laser Eye Surgery facilities in New Zealand.

To find out more, free phone 0800 99 2020, email us at   or visit our website at www.eyeinstitute.co.nz

Cataracts

Cataracts are the most common age-related occurrence in eyes. The lens becomes thicker and stiffer and appears yellow and cloudy. Eventually it may turn white, changing the colour of the pupil. A cataract may cause your vision to become fuzzy in a progressive fashion and may also be the cause of disabling glare. Once a cataract affects vision too much, a cataract removal operation is generally advised. This decision is usually made in consultation with an eye specialist. The operation is almost always done under local anaesthetic. Once the cataract has been removed an artificial lens is put in to replace it. It is relatively short in duration and an overnight stay in hospital is not required. Post-operative care consists of eye drops and a check at 1-2 days then after 2-4 weeks. Having performed over one hundred thousand cataract surgeries, Eye Institute surgeons are at the leading edge of microsurgical eye care. Eye Institute is known for exceptional patient care and is one of the premier eye centres in New Zealand. To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/

Cataracts are the most common age-related occurrence in eyes. The lens becomes thicker and stiffer and appears yellow and cloudy. Eventually it may turn white, changing the colour of the pupil. A cataract may cause your vision to become fuzzy in a progressive fashion and may also be the cause of disabling glare.
Once a cataract affects vision too much, a cataract removal operation is generally advised.  This decision is usually made in consultation with an eye specialist. The operation is almost always done under local anaesthetic. Once the cataract has been removed an artificial lens is put in to replace it. It is relatively short in duration and an overnight stay in hospital is not required.  Post-operative care consists of eye drops and a check at 1-2 days then after 2-4 weeks.

Having performed over one hundred thousand cataract surgeries, Eye Institute surgeons are at the leading edge of microsurgical eye care.

Eye Institute is known for exceptional patient care and is one of the premier eye centres in New Zealand.

To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at   or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/
Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve and may result in vision loss and blindness. Multiple factors are often important in causing glaucoma, but it is most commonly related to in an increase in pressure in the eye. Symptoms are generally absent until the condition has progressed to an advanced stage. Very occasionally, a rarer form of glaucoma can develop suddenly and symptoms may then include: headaches and aches around the affected eye, seeing halos around lights, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting. You may be more likely to develop glaucoma if you: have someone else in your family with glaucoma already have high pressure in your eye have experienced injury to your eye have or have had certain other eye problems have migraine or circulation problems. Glaucoma is more common in people over 50 years of age and more common in women than men. Diagnosis usually comes after consultation with an eye doctor. Signs of glaucoma may also be picked up at an optometrist’s eye examination. The following tests are used to diagnose and monitor glaucoma: Tonometry – measures eye pressure. It is often the first screening test for glaucoma. The eyes are numbed with eye drops and then examined. Dilated eye exam - this is done with an ophthalmoscope (which is a medical instrument that allows the doctor to look through the pupil to the back of the eye).The retina and optic nerve are then examined for any sign of damage. Visual acuity test – test to check distance vision using an eye chart. Visual field test – test to measure side (peripheral) vision. Pachymetry – test to measure the thickness of the cornea. Many other new techniques are emerging to help identify the likelihood of glaucoma and help determine its rate of worsening. Although glaucoma cannot be cured, early treatment can prevent further worsening of the condition and vision loss. Regular eye examinations will need to be continued life-long. Eye drops to decrease eye pressure are the most common early treatment. Surgery may be required, especially if medications are not taking adequate effect. Laser trabeculoplasty, in which a surgeon uses a laser to help the fluid drain from the eye, may be considered in some cases, but has limited effectiveness. More commonly, a trabeculectomy may be performed when other methods have failed to adequately control pressure. This is a medium length operation that makes a new opening for fluid to drain from the eye. The specialists at Eye Institute, are acknowledged leaders in ophthalmology, including laser surgery, cataract surgery and glaucoma surgery, and also offer expertise in glaucoma management, neuro-ophthalmology, retina, squint, eyelid surgery, eye infections and inflammation. To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve and may result in vision loss and blindness. Multiple factors are often important in causing glaucoma, but it is most commonly related to in an increase in pressure in the eye. Symptoms are generally absent until the condition has progressed to an advanced stage.  Very occasionally, a rarer form of glaucoma can develop suddenly and symptoms may then include: headaches and aches around the affected eye, seeing halos around lights, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting.
You may be more likely to develop glaucoma if you:
  • have someone else in your family with glaucoma
  • already have high pressure in your eye
  • have experienced injury to your eye
  • have or have had certain other eye problems
  • have migraine or circulation problems.
 
Glaucoma is more common in people over 50 years of age and more common in women than men. Diagnosis usually comes after consultation with an eye doctor. Signs of glaucoma may also be picked up at an optometrist’s eye examination.
The following tests are used to diagnose and monitor glaucoma:
  • Tonometry – measures eye pressure.  It is often the first screening test for glaucoma. The eyes are numbed with eye drops and then examined. 
  • Dilated eye exam - this is done with an ophthalmoscope (which is a medical instrument that allows the doctor to look through the pupil to the back of the eye).The retina and optic nerve are then examined for any sign of damage. 
  • Visual acuity test – test to check distance vision using an eye chart.
  • Visual field test – test to measure side (peripheral) vision. 
  • Pachymetry – test to measure the thickness of the cornea.
 
Many other new techniques are emerging to help identify the likelihood of glaucoma and help determine its rate of worsening. Although glaucoma cannot be cured, early treatment can prevent further worsening of the condition and vision loss. Regular eye examinations will need to be continued life-long. 

Eye drops to decrease eye pressure are the most common early treatment.  Surgery may be required, especially if medications are not taking adequate effect. 

Laser trabeculoplasty, in which a surgeon uses a laser to help the fluid drain from the eye, may be considered in some cases, but has limited effectiveness.

More commonly, a trabeculectomy may be performed when other methods have failed to adequately control pressure. This is a medium length operation that makes a new opening for fluid to drain from the eye.

The specialists at Eye Institute, are acknowledged leaders in ophthalmology, including laser surgery, cataract surgery and glaucoma surgery, and also offer expertise in glaucoma management, neuro-ophthalmology, retina, squint, eyelid surgery, eye infections and inflammation.

To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at   or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/
Diabetic Retinopathy

This is a complication of diabetes and is caused by small blood vessel damage within the retina of the eye. It commonly affects both eyes and may cause permanent loss of vision. Macular oedema is sometimes also present with diabetic retinopathy. Macular oedema is when fluid leaks into the retina and causes swelling and blurred vision. This may occur at any stage of diabetic retinopathy, but is more common as the disease progresses. There are often no symptoms in the early stages but as the condition progresses vision may begin to become impaired. Often visual loss may be sudden and without warning. This is why it is imperative that at-risk diabetics have frequent eye checks. Poorly controlled diabetes and pregnancy in diabetes are risk factors for developing this condition. Often, first-stage diabetic retinopathy requires no active treatment on the eye but requires stabilisation of diabetes and regular eye examinations. With progressive retinopathy, a laser treatment called the PRP laser can be used. This works by shrinking enlarged blood vessels to prevent further bleeding into the retina. Severe bleeding may require a surgical procedure called a vitrectomy, where blood is surgically removed from the eye. Treatment of macular oedema, if present, is by focal laser treatment. Vision is stabilised by reducing the degree of fluid leakage into the retina. Often more than one treatment is required. With its sharp focus on patient care, Eye Institute does everything possible to make your treatment worry-free. To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/

This is a complication of diabetes and is caused by small blood vessel damage within the retina of the eye.  It commonly affects both eyes and may cause permanent loss of vision.  Macular oedema is sometimes also present with diabetic retinopathy.  Macular oedema is when fluid leaks into the retina and causes swelling and blurred vision.  This may occur at any stage of diabetic retinopathy, but is more common as the disease progresses. There are often no symptoms in the early stages but as the condition progresses vision may begin to become impaired.  Often visual loss may be sudden and without warning. This is why it is imperative that at-risk diabetics have frequent eye checks. Poorly controlled diabetes and pregnancy in diabetes are risk factors for developing this condition.
Often, first-stage diabetic retinopathy requires no active treatment on the eye but requires stabilisation of diabetes and regular eye examinations. With progressive retinopathy, a laser treatment called the PRP laser can be used. This works by shrinking enlarged blood vessels to prevent further bleeding into the retina. Severe bleeding may require a surgical procedure called a vitrectomy, where blood is surgically removed from the eye.
Treatment of macular oedema, if present, is by focal laser treatment. Vision is stabilised by reducing the degree of fluid leakage into the retina.  Often more than one treatment is required.

With its sharp focus on patient care, Eye Institute does everything possible to make your treatment worry-free.

To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at   or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/
Retinal Detachment

This is when the retina detaches, meaning it is lifted or separated from its normal position within the eye. An acute retinal detachment requires urgent assessment and appropriate treatment. Unless prompt and effective treatment is given, some forms of retinal detachment may lead to irreversible blindness. Signs and symptoms include: a sudden or gradual increase in floaters, deterioration in vision, cobwebs or specks with the visual field, light flashes in the eye or the appearance of curtains over the visual field. You are more likely to have a retinal detachment if you are very short-sighted or have had an injury or previous surgery to the eye. For minor detachments, a laser or freeze treatment (cryopexy) are used. Both therapies re-attach the retina. For major detachment, surgery will be necessary. A band is often put around the back of the eye to prevent further detachment. Surgical treatment is usually a vitrectomy, where the jelly (vitreous) is removed from the eye. This often involves a hospital stay. It can take several months post-surgery to see the final visual result. Hundreds of eye professionals throughout the country refer their patients to the Eye Institute for specialised eye treatment and surgery. To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/

This is when the retina detaches, meaning it is lifted or separated from its normal position within the eye. An acute retinal detachment requires urgent assessment and appropriate treatment. Unless prompt and effective treatment is given, some forms of retinal detachment may lead to irreversible blindness.
Signs and symptoms include: a sudden or gradual increase in floaters, deterioration in vision, cobwebs or specks with the visual field, light flashes in the eye or the appearance of curtains over the visual field. You are more likely to have a retinal detachment if you are very short-sighted or have had an injury or previous surgery to the eye.
For minor detachments, a laser or freeze treatment (cryopexy) are used.  Both therapies re-attach the retina. For major detachment, surgery will be necessary. A band is often put around the back of the eye to prevent further detachment.  Surgical treatment is usually a vitrectomy, where the jelly (vitreous) is removed from the eye. This often involves a hospital stay.  It can take several months post-surgery to see the final visual result.

Hundreds of eye professionals throughout the country refer their patients to the Eye Institute for specialised eye treatment and surgery.

To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at   or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/
Eyelid Surgery

Excess skin and/or fat can be surgically removed from your upper and/or lower eyelids to give your skin a less wrinkled and puffy appearance. The procedure typically involves making a small cut (incision) in the fold of the eyelid (for the upper lid) or just below the eyelashes (for the lower lid) and removing any excess skin and/or fat. The surgery will take 1-3 hours and is performed under local anaesthetic (the area being treated is numb) together with a sedative to make you feel drowsy. You will be able to go home the same day. It is recommended that you have complete rest and keep eye pads on for a couple of days after surgery. You should be able to return to work within 7-10 days. Eye Institute has gained a reputation as a centre of excellence among hundreds of eye doctors throughout New Zealand. To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/

Excess skin and/or fat can be surgically removed from your upper and/or lower eyelids to give your skin a less wrinkled and puffy appearance.
The procedure typically involves making a small cut (incision) in the fold of the eyelid (for the upper lid) or just below the eyelashes (for the lower lid) and removing any excess skin and/or fat. The surgery will take 1-3 hours and is performed under local anaesthetic (the area being treated is numb) together with a sedative to make you feel drowsy. You will be able to go home the same day. It is recommended that you have complete rest and keep eye pads on for a couple of days after surgery. You should be able to return to work within 7-10 days.

Eye Institute has gained a reputation as a centre of excellence among hundreds of eye doctors throughout New Zealand.

To find out more, free phone 0800 393 527, email us at   or visit our website at http://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/
Keratoconus

What is Keratoconus? Keratoconus is a condition in which the cornea (the clear front “window” of the eye) becomes weakened and develops an irregular shape. It generally affects both eyes although one eye may be much more affected than the other. The cornea does most of the eye’s focusing - therefore irregularity of its shape causes blurring of vision. As this progresses, glasses become less effective at improving vision. Click here for more information:

What is Keratoconus?
Keratoconus is a condition in which the cornea (the clear front “window” of the eye) becomes weakened and develops an irregular shape. It generally affects both eyes although one eye may be much more affected than the other.

The cornea does most of the eye’s focusing - therefore irregularity of its shape causes blurring of vision. As this progresses, glasses become less effective at improving vision.
 

Click here for more information:

Travel Directions

For Eye Institute, Remuera:
From the Southern Motorway (Northbound or Southbound) take the Market Road exit to Remuera Road and turn left into Remuera Road. Easy to find, the clinic is close to the city with easy motorway access at 123 Remuera Road.

Parking

For Eye Institute, Remuera:

Our premises have plenty of free parking below the clinic. A lift gives access to the reception level from the basements.

We also have wheelchair access and facilities at this clinic.

 

Eye Institute North:
Ample free parking is available.

Contact Details

123 Remuera Road, Remuera

Central Auckland

7:30 AM to 6:00 PM.

More details…

Northmed, 3 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland

North Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

More details…

19 Delta Avenue, New Lynn, Auckland

West Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

More details…

652 Great South Road, Manukau, Auckland

South Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

More details…

This page was last updated at 2:22PM on July 18, 2024. This information is reviewed and edited by Eye Institute - Auckland.