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Radiology | Lakes | Te Whatu Ora

Public Service, Radiology

Today

Description

Formerly Lakes DHB Radiology

What is Radiology?

Radiological procedures are used for looking at the internal structures of the body, whether bone or soft tissue. Usually these examinations are carried out to:

  • diagnose disease states, such as cancer or heart disease
  • show the extent of injury to body structures
  • to aid in interventional procedures, such as angiography.

The radiologist may use different methods such as X-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Ultrasound as well as some other specialised types of radiological imaging.

The Team

  • Medical Radiation Technologists (MRTs) or Radiographers perform your X-ray, barium and mammography examinations.
  • Sonographers are MRTs who perform your ultrasound examinations.
  • Radiologists  are specialist doctors who read and understand your films. They will also be involved if you have an intravenous urogram (IVU), barium study, mammogram and a number of other ultrasound procedures.  They interpret the results of the images and send them to your doctor.

Rotorua Hospital Radiology Services:

  • General x-rays
  • Computerised Tomography (CT Scan)
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
  • Fluoroscopy
  • Ultrasound including Vascular Ultrasound (US)
  • Interventional Procedures (CT/US/Fluoroscopy)

Where to find us: see the Rotorua Hospital map here

Taupō Hospital Radiology Services:

  • General x-rays

Where to find us: see the Taupō Hospital map here.

 

Lakes DHB outsources to other local private providers, as required.

Consultants

Note: Please note below that some people are not available at all locations.

  • Dr Mark Barnes

    Diagnostic & Interventional Radiologist (Head of Department)

    Available at Rotorua Hospital

  • Dr Richard Downing

    Diagnostic and Interventional Radiologist

    Available at Rotorua Hospital

  • Dr James Finch

    Diagnostic & Interventional Radiologist

    Available at Rotorua Hospital

  • Dr Barbara Hochstein

    Diagnostic & Interventional Radiologist

    Available at Rotorua Hospital

  • Dr Gregory Hunt

    Diagnostic & Interventional Radiologist

    Available at Rotorua Hospital

  • Dr Carl Huxford

    Diagnostic & Interventional Radiologist

    Available at Rotorua Hospital

Referral Expectations

You may be referred to the Radiology Department by your GP, ED or Outpatients or as part of your inpatient stay in our hospitals.

Charges

New Zealand citizens or those who have obtained permanent residence are entitled to publicly funded health care.

Non-residents may be required to pay for their health care.

Click here to read more about eligibility for funded care at Lakes DHB.

Hours

Mon – Fri 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Procedures / Treatments

X-ray

X-rays are available at Rotorua and Taupō hospitals. An x-ray is a high frequency, high energy wave form. It cannot be seen with the naked eye but can be picked up on photographic film. Although you may think of an x-ray as a picture of bones, a trained observer can also see air spaces, like the lungs (which look black) and fluid (which looks white, but not as white as bones). What to expect? You will have all metal objects removed from your body. You will be asked to remain still in a specific position and hold your breath on command. There are staff present, but they will not necessarily remain in the room, but will speak with you via an intercom system and will be viewing the procedure constantly through a windowed control room. The examination time will vary depending on the type of procedure required, but as a rule it will take around 30 minutes.

X-rays are available at Rotorua and Taupō hospitals.

An x-ray is a high frequency, high energy wave form. It cannot be seen with the naked eye but can be picked up on photographic film. Although you may think of an x-ray as a picture of bones, a trained observer can also see air spaces, like the lungs (which look black) and fluid (which looks white, but not as white as bones).

What to expect?
You will have all metal objects removed from your body. You will be asked to remain still in a specific position and hold your breath on command. There are staff present, but they will not necessarily remain in the room, but will speak with you via an intercom system and will be viewing the procedure constantly through a windowed control room. The examination time will vary depending on the type of procedure required, but as a rule it will take around 30 minutes.

Computed Tomography (CT)

CTs are available at Rotorua Hospital only. With CT you can differentiate many more things than with a normal x-ray. A CT image is created by using an x-ray beam, which is sent through the body from different angles, and by using a complicated mathematical process the computer of the CT is able to produce an image. This allows cross-sectional images of the body without cutting it open. The CT is used to view all body structures but especially soft tissue such as body organs (heart, lungs, liver etc). What to expect? You will have all metal objects removed from your body. You will lie down on a narrow padded moveable table that will be slid into the scanner, through a circular opening. You will feel nothing while the scan is in progress, but some people can feel slightly claustrophobic or closed in, whilst inside the scanner. You will be asked to remain still and hold your breath on command. There are staff present, but they will not necessarily remain in the room, but will speak with you via an intercom system and will be viewing the procedure constantly through a windowed control room, from where they will run the scanner. Some procedures will require contrast medium. Contrast medium is a substance that makes the image of the CT or MRI clearer. Contrast medium can be given by mouth, rectally, or by injection into the bloodstream. The scan time will vary depending on the type of examination required, but as a rule it will take around 30 minutes.

CTs are available at Rotorua Hospital only.

With CT you can differentiate many more things than with a normal x-ray. A CT image is created by using an x-ray beam, which is sent through the body from different angles, and by using a complicated mathematical process the computer of the CT is able to produce an image. This allows cross-sectional images of the body without cutting it open. The CT is used to view all body structures but especially soft tissue such as body organs (heart, lungs, liver etc).

What to expect?

You will have all metal objects removed from your body. You will lie down on a narrow padded moveable table that will be slid into the scanner, through a circular opening.

You will feel nothing while the scan is in progress, but some people can feel slightly claustrophobic or closed in, whilst inside the scanner. You will be asked to remain still and hold your breath on command. There are staff present, but they will not necessarily remain in the room, but will speak with you via an intercom system and will be viewing the procedure constantly through a windowed control room, from where they will run the scanner.

Some procedures will require contrast medium. Contrast medium is a substance that makes the image of the CT or MRI clearer. Contrast medium can be given by mouth, rectally, or by injection into the bloodstream.

The scan time will vary depending on the type of examination required, but as a rule it will take around 30 minutes.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

MRIs are available at Rotorua Hospital only. An MRI machine does not work like an x-ray or CT; it is used for exact images of internal organs and body structures. This method delivers clear images without the exposure of radiation. The procedure uses a combination of magnetic fields and radio waves which results in an image being made using the MRI's computer. What to expect? You will have all metal objects removed from your body. You will lie down on a narrow padded moveable table that will be slid into the scanner, through a circular opening. You will feel nothing while the scan is in progress, but some people can feel slightly claustrophobic or closed in, whilst inside the scanner. You will be asked to remain still and hold your breath on command. There are staff present, but they will not necessarily remain in the room, but will speak with you via an intercom system and will be viewing the procedure constantly through a windowed control room, from where they will run the scanner. Some procedures will require contrast medium. Contrast medium is a substance that makes the image of the CT or MRI clearer. Contrast can be given by mouth, rectally, or by injection into the bloodstream. The scan time will vary depending on the type of examination required, but as a rule it will take around 30 minutes.

MRIs are available at Rotorua Hospital only.

An MRI machine does not work like an x-ray or CT; it is used for exact images of internal organs and body structures. This method delivers clear images without the exposure of radiation.

The procedure uses a combination of magnetic fields and radio waves which results in an image being made using the MRI's computer.

What to expect?

You will have all metal objects removed from your body. You will lie down on a narrow padded moveable table that will be slid into the scanner, through a circular opening.

You will feel nothing while the scan is in progress, but some people can feel slightly claustrophobic or closed in, whilst inside the scanner. You will be asked to remain still and hold your breath on command. There are staff present, but they will not necessarily remain in the room, but will speak with you via an intercom system and will be viewing the procedure constantly through a windowed control room, from where they will run the scanner.

Some procedures will require contrast medium. Contrast medium is a substance that makes the image of the CT or MRI clearer. Contrast can be given by mouth, rectally, or by injection into the bloodstream.

The scan time will vary depending on the type of examination required, but as a rule it will take around 30 minutes.

Ultrasound

Ultrasounds are available at Rotorua Hospital only. In ultrasound, a beam of sound at a very high frequency (that cannot be heard) is sent into the body from a small vibrating crystal in a hand-held scanner head. When the beam meets a surface between tissues of different density, echoes of the sound beam are sent back into the scanner head. The time between sending the sound and receiving the echo back is fed into a computer, which in turn creates an image that is projected on a television screen. Ultrasound is a very safe type of imaging; this is why it is so widely used during pregnancy. Doppler Ultrasound A Doppler study is a noninvasive test that can be used to evaluate blood flow by bouncing high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) off red blood cells. The Doppler Effect is a change in the frequency of sound waves caused by moving objects. A Doppler study can estimate how fast blood flows by measuring the rate of change in its pitch (frequency). A Doppler study can help diagnose bloody clots, heart and leg valve problems and blocked or narrowed arteries. What to expect? After lying down, the area to be examined will be exposed. Generally a contact gel will be used between the scanner head and skin. The scanner head is then pressed against your skin and moved around and over the area to be examined. At the same time the internal images will appear onto a screen.

Ultrasounds are available at Rotorua Hospital only.

In ultrasound, a beam of sound at a very high frequency (that cannot be heard) is sent into the body from a small vibrating crystal in a hand-held scanner head. When the beam meets a surface between tissues of different density, echoes of the sound beam are sent back into the scanner head. The time between sending the sound and receiving the echo back is fed into a computer, which in turn creates an image that is projected on a television screen. Ultrasound is a very safe type of imaging; this is why it is so widely used during pregnancy.

Doppler Ultrasound

A Doppler study is a noninvasive test that can be used to evaluate blood flow by bouncing high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) off red blood cells. The Doppler Effect is a change in the frequency of sound waves caused by moving objects. A Doppler study can estimate how fast blood flows by measuring the rate of change in its pitch (frequency). A Doppler study can help diagnose bloody clots, heart and leg valve problems and blocked or narrowed arteries.

What to expect?

After lying down, the area to be examined will be exposed. Generally a contact gel will be used between the scanner head and skin. The scanner head is then pressed against your skin and moved around and over the area to be examined. At the same time the internal images will appear onto a screen.

Pharmacy

Click here to find your nearest community pharmacy.

Other

Click on the location links for more information on your trip to Rotorua Hospital or Taupō Hospital, including:

Contact Details

This page was last updated at 10:52AM on June 23, 2021. This information is reviewed and edited by Radiology | Lakes | Te Whatu Ora.