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Diabetes Centre | Auckland | Te Toka Tumai | Te Whatu Ora

Public Service, Endocrinology

Today

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Description

Formerly Auckland DHB Diabetes Centre
 
What is diabetes?
Diabetes is a group of conditions which cause high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. This is primarily because the pancreas (an organ at the back of the abdomen) is not producing any or enough insulin. In many instances, especially where people are overweight, there is also resistance to insulin’s action in many body cells, particularly in the liver and muscle.
 
There are two main types – Type 1 and Type 2. We see people with both these types, as well as some less common causes. There is currently no known cure for either type of diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is less common than Type 2 and accounts for around 5 -10% of all cases in the Auckland population. It is an auto-immune condition where the body recognises the pancreas as “foreign” and attacks it. The pancreas thus makes less and less insulin, sometimes none at all. This type can occur at all ages, but is found most commonly in children, adolescents and young adults. People with Type 1 diabetes require regular insulin injections to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. (Insulin cannot be given in tablet form.)
 
Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% or more of those with diabetes. In this case the pancreas is still producing insulin but the production is reduced and gets progressively less with time. The body is also resistant to the insulin to varying degrees; being overweight is almost always the cause of insulin resistance. Those with Type 2 diabetes usually require lifestyle (weight, dietary and exercise) changes then often tablets. Most people will eventually require insulin injections – even if they comply with diet and exercise.
 
Both of these types of diabetes can cause serious health problems if the blood sugars are not “controlled” i.e. kept as normal as possible.

Potential problems include:

  • Eye damage, called “retinopathy” which can eventually lead to blindness if not treated
  • Kidney damage eventually leading to renal failure and the need for dialysis
  • Foot problems including ulcers, painful feet and, sometimes, amputation
  • Premature heart attacks and strokes.

The good news is that these problems can be largely avoided or delayed by maintaining healthy blood sugar levels, having regular checks of the eyes, kidneys, and feet and for heart risk factors. There are effective treatments for many of these problems if detected early.

If you wish to view information about the Endocrinology service, please click on this link to the ADHB Endocrinology service .

Consultants

Referral Expectations

Appointment Information

What should I expect of my first nurse, dietitian or doctors appointment?
On your first appointment with a nurse, dietitian or doctor you will be asked questions about your own health history and that of your family. This helps us to understand both what your current health problems are and evaluate your risk of future health problems.

Please feel free to write down details and bring them with you.

At this appointment and all subsequent appointments please bring with you:

  • All your medication bottles (or a complete list including doses) 
  • Records of your home blood sugar readings (if you test your sugars at home)
  • If you have received a blood test form: please have these done about 5-10 days before your appointment, the results will then be available for us to discuss with you.

Auckland City Hospital Inpatients
If you are a patient in Auckland City Hospital who needs urgent help with your diabetes during other treatments or other input from our medical or nursing staff, you can be seen as an inpatient. If you are an inpatient but need to be seen less urgently, you may be referred for outpatient follow up in either our Greenlane clinic or at one of the satellite clinics.

Young Adult Clinic
We see young people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes aged 16-25 years. Younger children are being seen by the Starship diabetes team. Our aim is to help our young people attain optimal diabetes management during this busy period in their lives as they move from school into tertiary study or employment.

Appointments
Your appointment at the clinic will depend on what has been requested by your GP, or other referrer, in his/her referral letter. You may either receive a one-off appointment or you will continue to have regular appointments depending on your needs. Your care is shared with your GP who will continue to care for you in the long term, in the community. You will be referred back to the specialists when the need arises. Some people with complex medical needs and problems will be reviewed regularly.


With the exception of retinal screening, appointments for services are made depending on the clinical need and urgency.

 

Care Between Appointments

The nurses at the Diabetes Centre can be contacted between appointments via phone or email, though they do not take calls while seeing other patients. Nurses can often answer questions or help you adjust medication in this manner without the need for a visit.

If your blood sugars are not meeting your targets your nurse may suggest that you send in records of your home blood sugar testing on an occasional basis to help with adjustments in your medication. They will instruct you as to whether you need to test your sugars at home and, if so, what numbers you should be aiming for - this will differ from patient to patient.

IMPORTANT Information
Please have with you, when you call or attend the Centre:

  • Your recent blood glucose results
  • Your medication or an up-to-date list of what you are taking.

How To Help Us, Help You

There are never enough available appointments. If you can't come, please let us know on (09) 630 9950 as soon as possible, so we can use the appointment for someone else.
Cancellations on the day waste valuable time.
Please be on time. We see patients as close to scheduled appointment time as possible - if you are late, you will need to wait until there is a gap.

Charges

New Zealand citizens or those who have obtained permanent residence are entitled to publicly funded healthcare. Non-residents may be required to pay for their healthcare. If you were not born in New Zealand and have not previously shown evidence of residency you should bring your passport with you on your first visit to the hospital for verification. You should show your passport to the Cashier's Desk along from the Help Desk on the ground floor. This desk is staffed from 8am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.

Hours

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Mon – Fri 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Services

Doctors

We have a number of specialists and registrars (trainee specialists) who work at the Centre. Not all patients need to be seen by a specialist or trainee specialist, but they are available if required. In some situations a doctor will provide advice on management after reviewing results and discussing with the GP.

We have a number of specialists and registrars (trainee specialists) who work at the Centre.

Not all patients need to be seen by a specialist or trainee specialist, but they are available if required.

In some situations a doctor will provide advice on management after reviewing results and discussing with the GP.

Diabetes Nurse/Duty Nurse/Community Clinics

Most (although not all) patients who come to the Diabetes Centre will see one of our specialist nurses. Their main role is to teach you about diabetes and how to look after your diabetes (for example how to test your blood sugars at home). They may also help adjust medication and insulin doses if required. What Diabetes Nurses Do We teach people with diabetes and their families: steps necessary to reduce the risk of complications about effectively managing their glycaemic control with diet, exercise and lifestyle changes We provide education and resources so people with diabetes and their families can develop an understanding of how this chronic disease affects them by: teaching monitoring skills and how to interpret and take appropriate action to achieve treatment targets teaching what are healthy foods (with the dietitian) and necessary exercise why it is important to always take medication as the doctor orders teaching how to use insulin if this is necessary teaching people how to cope with changes in life that occur e.g. holidays, festive times, stress. We work with our team of doctors, dietitians, podiatrists and in shared care with General Practitioners. Where Care is Provided From: Auckland City Hospital Held at: • all wards who request the assistance of a Diabetes Nurse to help you while you are in hospital. • as a patient you can ask for our assistance. Greenlane Clinical Centre How We Provide Support to You One on one sessions with you and your family/caregiver where we: • assess your needs • discuss with you how these problems can be solved • give support to you when you start using insulin and other medication • help you with other associated problems. Group sessions for: • groups of people with similar problems • groups of people with an ethnic association needing interpreters. Telephone follow-up • we are happy to spend time with you on the telephone to discuss any issues you may have. See under "Other" for our Diabetes Nursing Staff List. Auckland Diabetes Centre Held at: 1st Floor, Building 4, Reception G Greenlane Clinical Centre 214 Greenlane West Satellite Clinics Carrington Satellite Clinic - Nurse, Dietitian and Podiatrist Rehab + 54 Carrington Road, Point Chevalier 1022 Operates on: Thursdays - Fortnightly, Friday - Weekly City Clinic (Young Adults) - Nurse and Dietitian University of Auckland - University Student Health and Counselling Service Level 3, Kate Edger Information Commons 2 Alfred Street Auckland 1010 Operates on: Wednesday afternoon - Monthly City Clinic (Young Adults) Park Rd - Diabetologist Auckland City Hospital Outpatient Clinic 2 Park Road Auckland 1010 Operates on: Tuesday - Monthly Mt Roskill Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian Wesley Community Centre 740 Sandringham Road extension Mt Roskill 1041 Operates on: Thursdays - Weekly Otahuhu Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian Library 28/30 Mason Ave Otahuhu, Auckland 1062 Operates on: Tuesdays - Fortnightly Glen Innes Satellite Clinic (Keruru Kidney Centre) Keruru Kidney Centre 45 Point England Rd Glen Innes 1072 Operates on: Mondays/Wednesdays Weekly & Thursday Monthly Waiheke Island (General Clinician) Waiheke Centre 61 Ostend Road Waiheke Island Operates on: Wednesdays - BiMonthly (every 2 months) Waiheke Island Satellite Clinic (Podiatry Only) Waiheke Health Trust 5 Belgium Street Ostend Waiheke Island Operates on: every 6 months Great Barrier Island - Nurse and Diabetologist Piritahi Hao Ora Trust Marae-based Primary Health Care clinic on Waiheke Island 54 Tahatai Road, Oneroa Auckland 1083 Operates on: 18 months These satellite clinics are available for those who are having difficulty getting into our Greenlane Centre due to mobility or transport problems. Places are limited in these clinics and we do not offer the full range of services in these areas (these clinics usually include nurses and dietitians only). We also offer occasional clinics on Waiheke Island and Great Barrier Island; once again spaces in these clinics are limited and places are given based on need. Specialist Teams Young Adult MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) Clinic with the Young Adult Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian, Psychologist) - Greenlane Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre Operates on: Monday afternoon - Fortnightly Pump MDT Clinic (Insulin Pump) Clinic with the Pump Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian) - Greenlane Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre Operates on: Bimonthly (every 2 months) Diabetes Duty Nurse Available: Monday to Friday, 8am to 4pm. Phone: (09) 623 6440 for a health professional within ADHB. Email:

Most (although not all) patients who come to the Diabetes Centre will see one of our specialist nurses. Their main role is to teach you about diabetes and how to look after your diabetes (for example how to test your blood sugars at home). They may also help adjust medication and insulin doses if required.

What Diabetes Nurses Do
We teach people with diabetes and their families:

  • steps necessary to reduce the risk of complications 
  • about effectively managing their glycaemic control with diet, exercise and lifestyle changes

We provide education and resources so people with diabetes and their families can develop an understanding of how this chronic disease affects them by:

  • teaching monitoring skills and how to interpret and take appropriate action to achieve treatment targets 
  • teaching what are healthy foods (with the dietitian) and necessary exercise
  • why it is important to always take medication as the doctor orders
  • teaching how to use insulin if this is necessary
  • teaching people how to cope with changes in life that occur e.g. holidays, festive times, stress.

We work with our team of doctors, dietitians, podiatrists and in shared care with General Practitioners.

Where Care is Provided From:

Auckland City Hospital
Held at:
• all wards who request the assistance of a Diabetes Nurse to help you while you are in hospital.
• as a patient you can ask for our assistance.


Greenlane Clinical Centre
How We Provide Support to You

  1. One on one sessions with you and your family/caregiver where we:
    • assess your needs
    • discuss with you how these problems can be solved
    • give support to you when you start using insulin and other medication
    • help you with other associated problems.
  2. Group sessions for: 
    • groups of people with similar problems
    • groups of people with an ethnic association needing interpreters.
  3. Telephone follow-up
    • we are happy to spend time with you on the telephone to discuss any issues you may have.

See under "Other" for our Diabetes Nursing Staff List.

Auckland Diabetes Centre
Held at: 
1st Floor, Building 4, Reception G
Greenlane Clinical Centre
214 Greenlane West

Satellite Clinics

Carrington Satellite Clinic - Nurse, Dietitian and Podiatrist
Rehab +
54 Carrington Road, Point Chevalier 1022
Operates on: Thursdays - Fortnightly, Friday - Weekly


City Clinic (Young Adults)
 - 
Nurse and Dietitian
University of Auckland - University Student Health and Counselling Service 
Level 3, Kate Edger Information Commons
2 Alfred Street
Auckland 1010

Operates on: Wednesday afternoon - Monthly 

City Clinic (Young Adults) Park Rd - Diabetologist
Auckland City Hospital 
Outpatient Clinic 
2 Park Road
Auckland 1010

Operates on: Tuesday - Monthly 

Mt Roskill Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian
Wesley Community Centre
740 Sandringham Road extension
Mt Roskill 1041

Operates on: Thursdays - Weekly

Otahuhu Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian
Library 28/30 Mason Ave 
Otahuhu, Auckland 1062

Operates on: Tuesdays - Fortnightly

Glen Innes Satellite Clinic (Keruru Kidney Centre)
Keruru Kidney Centre
45 Point England Rd
Glen Innes 1072

Operates on: Mondays/Wednesdays Weekly & Thursday Monthly

Waiheke Island (General Clinician)
Waiheke Centre
61 Ostend Road
Waiheke Island

Operates on:  Wednesdays - BiMonthly (every 2 months)

Waiheke Island Satellite Clinic (Podiatry Only)
Waiheke Health Trust
5 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke Island

Operates on: every 6 months

Great Barrier Island - Nurse and Diabetologist
Piritahi Hao Ora Trust
Marae-based Primary Health Care clinic on Waiheke Island
54 Tahatai Road, Oneroa
Auckland 1083

Operates on: 18 months

These satellite clinics are available for those who are having difficulty getting into our Greenlane Centre due to mobility or transport problems. Places are limited in these clinics and we do not offer the full range of services in these areas (these clinics usually include nurses and dietitians only).

We also offer occasional clinics on Waiheke Island and Great Barrier Island; once again spaces in these clinics are limited and places are given based on need. 

Specialist Teams

Young Adult MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) Clinic with the Young Adult Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian, Psychologist) - Greenlane
Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre

Operates on: Monday afternoon - Fortnightly

Pump MDT Clinic (Insulin Pump) Clinic with the Pump Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian) - Greenlane
Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre

Operates on: Bimonthly (every 2 months)

Diabetes Duty Nurse
Available: Monday to Friday, 8am to 4pm.
Phone: (09) 623 6440 for a health professional within ADHB.

Email: 

Diabetes Specialist Dietitian/DAFNE (Type 1 Self Management Course)/Community Satellite Clinics

We have experienced Diabetes Dietitians, who offer specialist Medical Nutrition Therapy for people with Diabetes. Dietitians are trained under the Masters in Dietetics programme (5 year Dietetic Training) and are registered with the New Zealand Dietitians Board. The role of a dietitian is to evaluate scientific evidence about food and nutrition, and translate it into practical strategies. New Zealand dietitians work in partnership with individuals, whanau, communities and populations, in states of health and disease, to support optimal health and wellbeing. Dietitians use their dietetic knowledge, skill and judgement in a variety of contexts, which includes promoting and protecting public health, directing and delivering medical nutrition therapy services, and managing food and health systems. They may perform a variety of functions, including policy development, leadership, management, research, education, and communication roles. Scope of Practice for Dietitians, Gazetted by the Dietitians Board, April 2017 “A dietitian is a person with a qualification in nutrition and dietetics recognised by national authority [s]. The dietitian applies the science of nutrition to the feeding and education of groups of people and individuals in health and disease.” Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is an integral component of all aspects of diabetes care from prevention to managing existing diabetes. MNT uses the latest available scientific evidence, takes into account treatment goals, includes clients in the decision making process and is individualised according to clients' needs. Auckland Diabetes Centre Diabetes Dietitians offer one-on-one consultation for patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes at the Greenlane Clinical Centre or at specified community satellite clinics. For Type 1 diabetes patients, we also run a DAFNE (Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating) self management course (since 2009) - 5 courses per year. For Type 2 diabetes patients, we are running 4x1hr courses on:- 1. What is diabetes and introduction to carbohydrate counting - 25th August 2017 2. Fat and label reading - 1st September 2017 3. Sugar and label reading - 15th September 2017 4. Meal planning and how to eat healthily on a budget - 29th September 2017 Due to large demands on our service we are not able to offer long term follow-up or intensive programmes for weight loss. We are also involved in the training of other health professionals. At present we accept referrals for the following: • Type 1 diabetes • Type 2 diabetes, complex Those with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle and/or Metformin treatment only) are advised to attend a Diabetes Self Management (DSME) course run in the community. Greenlane Clinical Centre How We Provide Support to You One on one sessions with you and your family/caregiver where we: • Assess your needs • Discuss with you how these problems can be solved • Give support to you when you start using insulin and other medication • Help you with other associated problems. Group sessions for: • Type 1 Diabetes - DAFNE course AND Type 2 Diabetes Telephone follow-up Auckland Diabetes Centre Held at: 1st Floor, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre 214 Greenlane Road Satellite Clinics Carrington Satellite Clinic - Nurse, Dietitian and Podiatrist Rehab + 54 Carrington Road, Point Chevalier 1022 Operates on: Thursdays - Fortnightly, Friday - Weekly City Clinic (Young Adults) - Nurse and Dietitian University of Auckland - University Student Health and Counselling Service Level 3, Kate Edger Information Commons 2 Alfred Street Auckland 1010 Operates on: Wednesday afternoon - Monthly City Clinic (Young Adults) Park Rd - Diabetologist Auckland City Hospital Outpatient Clinic 2 Park Road Auckland 1010 Operates on: Tuesday - Monthly Mt Roskill Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian Wesley Community Centre 740 Sandringham Road extension Mt Roskill 1041 Operates on: Thursdays - Weekly Otahuhu Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian Library 28/30 Mason Ave Otahuhu, Auckland 1062 Operates on: Tuesdays - Fortnightly Glen Innes Satellite Clinic (Keruru Kidney Centre) Keruru Kidney Centre 45 Point England Rd Glen Innes 1072 Operates on: Mondays/Wednesdays Weekly & Thursday Monthly Waiheke Island (General Clinician) Waiheke Centre 61 Ostend Road Waiheke Island Operates on: Wednesdays - BiMonthly (every 2 months) Waiheke Island Satellite Clinic (Podiatry Only) Waiheke Health Trust 5 Belgium Street Ostend Waiheke Island Operates on: every 6 months Great Barrier Island - Nurse and Diabetologist Piritahi Hao Ora Trust Marae-based Primary Health Care clinic on Waiheke Island 54 Tahatai Road, Oneroa Auckland 1083 Operates on: 18 months These satellite clinics are available for those who are having difficulty getting into our Greenlane Centre due to mobility or transport problems. Places are limited in these clinics and we do not offer the full range of services in these areas (these clinics usually include nurses and dietitians only). We also offer occasional clinics on Waiheke Island and Great Barrier Island; once again spaces in these clinics are limited and places are given based on need. Specialist Teams Young Adult MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) Clinic with the Young Adult Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian, Psychologist) - Greenlane Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre Operates on: Monday afternoon - Fortnightly Pump MDT Clinic (Insulin Pump) Clinic with the Pump Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian) - Greenlane Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre Operates on: Bimonthly (every 2 months) Diabetes Dietitians Jennifer Robb - Dietitian Team Supervisor Kate Ellison - Senior Diabetes Dietitian NZRD (Prescriber), PGDipDiet, BSc (Human Nutrition), DAFNE accredited Diabetes Educator Hannah Hoeksema - Diabetes Dietitian NZRD (Prescriber), MHSc (Nutrition & Dietetics), BSc (Human Nutrition), DAFNE accredited Diabetes Educator Annabelle Malone - Diabetes Dietitian NZRD (Prescriber), MHSc (Nutrition & Dietetics), BSc (Human Nutrition) Foundations of Care and Comprehensive Medical Evaluation including MNT, Diabetes Care 2016.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf (PDF, 713.3 KB)

We have experienced Diabetes Dietitians, who offer specialist Medical Nutrition Therapy for people with Diabetes. 

Dietitians are trained under the Masters in Dietetics programme (5 year Dietetic Training) and are registered with the New Zealand Dietitians Board.  The role of a dietitian is to evaluate scientific evidence about food and nutrition, and translate it into practical strategies. New Zealand dietitians work in partnership with individuals, whanau, communities and populations, in states of health and disease, to support optimal health and wellbeing.

Dietitians use their dietetic knowledge, skill and judgement in a variety of contexts, which includes promoting and protecting public health, directing and delivering medical nutrition therapy services, and managing food and health systems. They may perform a variety of functions, including policy development, leadership, management, research, education, and communication roles.

Scope of Practice for Dietitians, Gazetted by the Dietitians Board, April 2017

“A dietitian is a person with a qualification in nutrition and dietetics recognised by national authority [s]. The dietitian applies the science of nutrition to the feeding and education of groups of people and individuals in health and disease.”

Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is an integral component of all aspects of diabetes care from prevention to managing existing diabetes. MNT uses the latest available scientific evidence, takes into account treatment goals, includes clients in the decision making process and is individualised according to clients' needs.

Auckland Diabetes Centre Diabetes Dietitians offer one-on-one consultation for patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes at the Greenlane Clinical Centre or at specified community satellite clinics.

For Type 1 diabetes patients, we also run a DAFNE (Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating) self management course (since 2009) - 5 courses per year. 

For Type 2 diabetes patients, we are running 4x1hr courses on:-

1. What is diabetes and introduction to carbohydrate counting - 25th August 2017

2. Fat and label reading - 1st September 2017

3. Sugar and label reading - 15th September 2017

4. Meal planning and how to eat healthily on a budget - 29th September 2017

Due to large demands on our service we are not able to offer long term follow-up or intensive programmes for weight loss. 

We are also involved in the training of other health professionals.

At present we accept referrals for the following:
• Type 1 diabetes
• Type 2 diabetes, complex 

Those with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle and/or Metformin treatment only) are advised to attend a Diabetes Self Management (DSME) course run in the community.


Greenlane Clinical Centre
How We Provide Support to You 

  1. One on one sessions with you and your family/caregiver where we: 
    • Assess your needs 
    • Discuss with you how these problems can be solved 
    • Give support to you when you start using insulin and other medication 
    • Help you with other associated problems.
  2. Group sessions for: 
    • Type 1 Diabetes - DAFNE course AND Type 2 Diabetes
  3. Telephone follow-up 

Auckland Diabetes Centre 
Held at: 
1st Floor, Building 4, 
Greenlane Clinical Centre 
214 Greenlane Road

Satellite Clinics

Carrington Satellite Clinic - Nurse, Dietitian and Podiatrist
Rehab +
54 Carrington Road, Point Chevalier 1022
Operates on: Thursdays - Fortnightly, Friday - Weekly


City Clinic (Young Adults)
 - 
Nurse and Dietitian
University of Auckland - University Student Health and Counselling Service 
Level 3, Kate Edger Information Commons
2 Alfred Street
Auckland 1010

Operates on: Wednesday afternoon - Monthly 

City Clinic (Young Adults) Park Rd - Diabetologist
Auckland City Hospital 
Outpatient Clinic 
2 Park Road
Auckland 1010

Operates on: Tuesday - Monthly 

Mt Roskill Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian
Wesley Community Centre
740 Sandringham Road extension
Mt Roskill 1041

Operates on: Thursdays - Weekly

Otahuhu Satellite Clinic - Nurse and Dietitian
Library 28/30 Mason Ave 
Otahuhu, Auckland 1062

Operates on: Tuesdays - Fortnightly

Glen Innes Satellite Clinic (Keruru Kidney Centre)
Keruru Kidney Centre
45 Point England Rd
Glen Innes 1072

Operates on: Mondays/Wednesdays Weekly & Thursday Monthly

Waiheke Island (General Clinician)
Waiheke Centre
61 Ostend Road
Waiheke Island

Operates on:  Wednesdays - BiMonthly (every 2 months)

Waiheke Island Satellite Clinic (Podiatry Only)
Waiheke Health Trust
5 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke Island

Operates on: every 6 months

Great Barrier Island - Nurse and Diabetologist
Piritahi Hao Ora Trust
Marae-based Primary Health Care clinic on Waiheke Island
54 Tahatai Road, Oneroa
Auckland 1083

Operates on: 18 months

These satellite clinics are available for those who are having difficulty getting into our Greenlane Centre due to mobility or transport problems. Places are limited in these clinics and we do not offer the full range of services in these areas (these clinics usually include nurses and dietitians only).

We also offer occasional clinics on Waiheke Island and Great Barrier Island; once again spaces in these clinics are limited and places are given based on need. 

 

Specialist Teams

Young Adult MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) Clinic with the Young Adult Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian, Psychologist) - Greenlane
Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre

Operates on: Monday afternoon - Fortnightly

Pump MDT Clinic (Insulin Pump) Clinic with the Pump Specialist Team (Diabetologist, Nurse, Dietitian) - Greenlane
Auckland Diabetes Centre, Level 1, Building 4, Greenlane Clinical Centre

Operates on: Bimonthly (every 2 months)

 

Diabetes Dietitians
Jennifer Robb - Dietitian Team Supervisor

Kate Ellison - Senior Diabetes Dietitian

NZRD (Prescriber), PGDipDiet, BSc (Human Nutrition), DAFNE accredited Diabetes Educator

Hannah Hoeksema - Diabetes Dietitian
NZRD (Prescriber), MHSc (Nutrition & Dietetics), BSc (Human Nutrition), DAFNE accredited Diabetes Educator

Annabelle Malone - Diabetes Dietitian

NZRD (Prescriber), MHSc (Nutrition & Dietetics), BSc (Human Nutrition)
 

Podiatry

The feet are supplied with blood to keep them healthy. They also have a multitude of nerves that act as an emergency warning system. For example, if there is a stone in the shoe, the nerves will send a message to the brain to investigate. However, if diabetes is poorly controlled for a long period of time this may lead to: • Nerve damage, or ‘peripheral neuropathy’, which impairs sensation to the feet, and/or • Reduced blood supply, also known as ‘poor circulation’. Nerve damage may mean that the patient no longer notices the stone in their shoe, due to loss of sensation in their feet. This could then lead to an injury they can’t feel and possibly infection. If there is poor circulation, any injuries or infections on the feet (i.e. cuts, burns or scratches) will take longer to heal. This is due to less blood flowing into the arteries in the foot. Blood provides energy to working muscles and aids in healing any tissue damage. Most foot problems for people who have diabetes occur when injuries - and often infections - go unnoticed and untreated, or when healing is delayed due to poor circulation. Ulcers Ulcers are an area of skin that is broken and is taking longer than normal to heal. Often the inside of an ulcer looks white. Ulcers occur most often over the ball of the foot or on the bottom of the big toe. Ulcers on the sides of the foot are sometimes due to poorly fitting shoes. Remember, even though some ulcers do not hurt, every ulcer should be seen by a healthcare provider right away. Not getting treatment for an ulcer can result in infection or gangrene, which in turn can lead to losing a limb (amputation). Corns Corns and calluses are a thickening of the skin. They are caused by repeated pressure or rubbing on the same area of the foot. Corns are often round, raised areas on the foot at points where the foot rubs against the shoe. Calluses are often larger areas of thickened yellowish skin around the heels or underneath the foot. If not treated, corns and calluses can act like stones in the shoe, putting pressure on the tissue underneath them. This pressure can lead to bruising, infection or an ulcer. This damage is often hard to see because it is underneath the corn or callus. If there is nerve damage the patient may not feel any pain. Show any corns or calluses to a podiatrist to get them treated. Never try to cut or cure corns yourself. Cracks Neuropathy, excessive weight and poor footwear can lead to cracking of the skin. Cracks allow bacteria to enter the foot and can cause infection which can be serious. It is important to keep the skin on the feet soft and supple. Regularly moisturising the skin will help prevent cracks or fissures. Nails Problem nails can be caused by injury, fungal infection, curved nails and badly fitting shoes. An in-grown nail may be painful, red and swollen, or have a fluid discharge. It can get infected very quickly. Get any problem nails seen by a podiatrist. Podiatrists Alexandra Noble-Beasley BHSc (Podiatry), PGDiploma Podiatric Surgery Jenny Luke BHSc (Podiatry) Sowyma Balla Katie Rutherfurd Chavarith Mounlath Michelle Garrett (Podiatry Professional Clinical Leader) Andrea Connel (Associate Podiatry Professional Clinical Leader)

The feet are supplied with blood to keep them healthy. They also have a multitude of nerves that act as an emergency warning system. For example, if there is a stone in the shoe, the nerves will send a message to the brain to investigate. However, if diabetes is poorly controlled for a long period of time this may lead to:

• Nerve damage, or ‘peripheral neuropathy’, which impairs sensation to the feet, and/or
• Reduced blood supply, also known as ‘poor circulation’.

Nerve damage may mean that the patient no longer notices the stone in their shoe, due to loss of sensation in their feet. This could then lead to an injury they can’t feel and possibly infection.
If there is poor circulation, any injuries or infections on the feet (i.e. cuts, burns or scratches) will take longer to heal. This is due to less blood flowing into the arteries in the foot. Blood provides energy to working muscles and aids in healing any tissue damage.
Most foot problems for people who have diabetes occur when injuries - and often infections - go unnoticed and untreated, or when healing is delayed due to poor circulation.

Ulcers
Ulcers are an area of skin that is broken and is taking longer than normal to heal. Often the inside of an ulcer looks white. Ulcers occur most often over the ball of the foot or on the bottom of the big toe. Ulcers on the sides of the foot are sometimes due to poorly fitting shoes.
Remember, even though some ulcers do not hurt, every ulcer should be seen by a healthcare provider right away. Not getting treatment for an ulcer can result in infection or gangrene, which in turn can lead to losing a limb (amputation).

Corns
Corns and calluses are a thickening of the skin. They are caused by repeated pressure or rubbing on the same area of the foot. Corns are often round, raised areas on the foot at points where the foot rubs against the shoe. Calluses are often larger areas of thickened yellowish skin around the heels or underneath the foot.
If not treated, corns and calluses can act like stones in the shoe, putting pressure on the tissue underneath them. This pressure can lead to bruising, infection or an ulcer.

This damage is often hard to see because it is underneath the corn or callus. If there is nerve damage the patient may not feel any pain. Show any corns or calluses to a podiatrist to get them treated. Never try to cut or cure corns yourself.

Cracks
Neuropathy, excessive weight and poor footwear can lead to cracking of the skin. Cracks allow bacteria to enter the foot and can cause infection which can be serious. It is important to keep the skin on the feet soft and supple. Regularly moisturising the skin will help prevent cracks or fissures.

Nails
Problem nails can be caused by injury, fungal infection, curved nails and badly fitting shoes. An in-grown nail may be painful, red and swollen, or have a fluid discharge. It can get infected very quickly. Get any problem nails seen by a podiatrist.

Podiatrists
Alexandra Noble-Beasley 
BHSc (Podiatry), PGDiploma Podiatric Surgery
Jenny Luke BHSc (Podiatry)
Sowyma Balla 
Katie Rutherfurd
Chavarith Mounlath

Michelle Garrett (Podiatry Professional Clinical Leader)
Andrea Connel (Associate Podiatry Professional Clinical Leader)

 

 

Health Psychologist

Adult Diabetes Health Psychology Service We have an experienced health psychologist that specialises in diabetes psychology. Health psychologists are trained under a Post-Graduate Health Psychology programme (minimum 6 years training) and are registered with the New Zealand Psychologist’s Board. Diabetes Senior Health Psychologist Heidi Baxter MSc(Hons), PGDipHlthPsych Who Are Health Psychologists? Health psychologists fit somewhere between medicine and psychology. They have an understanding of physical health at the same time as behaviours, thoughts and feelings. In a nut shell they are interested in knowing about how diabetes affects people’s lives and how people’s lives affect how they live with diabetes. They are able to help people understand any struggles they are having with their diabetes self-management. Furthermore, they can support people to make changes that improve their physical and mental health outcomes. Health Psychologists are trained to use a range of proven psychological therapies that help people to make behavioural changes, lifestyle adjustments, reduce emotional distress, and improve their overall physical and mental well-being. Why See a Health Psychologist? Living with diabetes is challenging. In the early parts of the diabetes journey, there is a lot of new information and many changes you may need to make. This can feel really overwhelming and may take quite a bit of time to adjust to. It is common for people to experience a range of strong emotions and find it difficult to make changes. Many people discover that they feel sad, worried, or angry about how their physical health has changed their lives. This can be even more difficult when people have other problems and worries. Later on in the diabetes journey, many people find that they get worn out and exhausted. There are no breaks, lots of decisions to make, many medications to deal with, and constant monitoring. This can leave people feeling like they want to give up and go on a permanent holiday from diabetes. Thankfully, there are many things that can be done to get back on track no matter where people are on their diabetes journey. Taking some time to reflect and work through any struggles with diabetes can help people to improve their health and minimise the impact of it on the rest of their lives. Who Do We See? The diabetes health psychologist sees type 1 or type 2 patients under the Adult Diabetes Service for brief interventions. They work alongside diabetes doctors, nurses and other members of the health team to help overcome diabetes specific problems. Please note that this is not a general psychology service, nor a crisis service. Some of the common referral reasons are: · Adjustment to a new diagnosis · Difficulty taking medication · Difficulty monitoring blood glucose levels · Lifestyle changes · Diabetes distress/burnout · Fear of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia · Fear of complications · Needle anxiety · Health anxiety · Mild to moderate mood impacting on diabetes e.g. anxiety, depression, stress · Disordered eating relating to diabetes (diabulimia) How to arrange a referral If you are under the Adult Diabetes Service, you can ask your GP or diabetes team for a referral to the health psychologist. The psychologist will then contact you directly to arrange an appointment as soon as possible. If there is a waitlist, you will be informed by letter first and given an approximate time to be seen. Reference Map for Mental Health Service Referrals and Health Psychology Referrals (DOCX, 446.2 KB)

Adult Diabetes Health Psychology Service

We have an experienced health psychologist that specialises in diabetes psychology.

Health psychologists are trained under a Post-Graduate Health Psychology programme (minimum 6 years training) and are registered with the New Zealand Psychologist’s Board.

Diabetes Senior Health Psychologist
Heidi Baxter
MSc(Hons), PGDipHlthPsych

 

Who Are Health Psychologists?

Health psychologists fit somewhere between medicine and psychology. They have an understanding of physical health at the same time as behaviours, thoughts and feelings. In a nut shell they are interested in knowing about how diabetes affects people’s lives and how people’s lives affect how they live with diabetes. They are able to help people understand any struggles they are having with their diabetes self-management. Furthermore, they can support people to make changes that improve their physical and mental health outcomes. Health Psychologists are trained to use a range of proven psychological therapies that help people to make behavioural changes, lifestyle adjustments, reduce emotional distress, and improve their overall physical and mental well-being.

Why See a Health Psychologist?

Living with diabetes is challenging. In the early parts of the diabetes journey, there is a lot of new information and many changes you may need to make. This can feel really overwhelming and may take quite a bit of time to adjust to. It is common for people to experience a range of strong emotions and find it difficult to make changes. Many people discover that they feel sad, worried, or angry about how their physical health has changed their lives. This can be even more difficult when people have other problems and worries. Later on in the diabetes journey, many people find that they get worn out and exhausted. There are no breaks, lots of decisions to make, many medications to deal with, and constant monitoring. This can leave people feeling like they want to give up and go on a permanent holiday from diabetes. Thankfully, there are many things that can be done to get back on track no matter where people are on their diabetes journey. Taking some time to reflect and work through any struggles with diabetes can help people to improve their health and minimise the impact of it on the rest of their lives.

Who Do We See?

The diabetes health psychologist sees type 1 or type 2 patients under the Adult Diabetes Service for brief interventions. They work alongside diabetes doctors, nurses and other members of the health team to help overcome diabetes specific problems. Please note that this is not a general psychology service, nor a crisis service. Some of the common referral reasons are:

·         Adjustment to a new diagnosis

·         Difficulty taking medication

·         Difficulty monitoring blood glucose levels

·         Lifestyle changes

·         Diabetes distress/burnout

·         Fear of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia

·         Fear of complications

·         Needle anxiety

·         Health anxiety

·         Mild to moderate mood impacting on diabetes e.g. anxiety, depression, stress

·         Disordered eating relating to diabetes (diabulimia)

 

How to arrange a referral

If you are under the Adult Diabetes Service, you can ask your GP or diabetes team for a referral to the health psychologist. The psychologist will then contact you directly to arrange an appointment as soon as possible. If there is a waitlist, you will be informed by letter first and given an approximate time to be seen.

Health Care Coordinator

Leaisa Bartley Care Coordinator Referral Pathway (DOCX, 549.5 KB)

Leaisa Bartley

Visiting Hours

Not applicable as this is an outpatient service.

Other

Please click here for information on refreshments, parking and pharmacy facilities available at the Centre, as well as public transport options to the Centre.

Other useful links:

www.diabetesauckland.org.nz

www.diabetes.org.nz

www.realitycheck.org.au

www.diabetesyouth.org.nz

www.footcaresolutions.co.nz

www.moh.govt.nz

www.letsbeatdiabetes.org.nz

Diabetes Nurses

Marisa Guolo

Tricha Ball

Mele Kaufusi

Jane Whitta

Faieza Ali Khan 

Jane Wilkinson

Ji Chen

Cynthia Libalib

Gina Bergham

Sally Levie

Nana Tweneboah-Menasah

Sally Geary

Krizyl Ceas

Lauren Paynter-Muller

Beatitude Vimbai Kusemamuriwo

Suraya Kupasseril  

Aroha Parata (Healthcare Assistant)

Psychologist

Heidi Baxter 

Dietitians

Kate Ellison

Audrey Tay

Hannah Hoeksema

Annabelle Malone

Podiatrists

Alexandra Noble-Beasley

Jenny Luke

Sowmya Balla

Barbara Powell

Katie Rutherfurd

Retinal Coordinator

Amelia Frost

Care Coordinator

Leaisa Bartley

Contact Details

Greenlane Clinical Centre

Central Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

If your communication is for a particular individual please make that clear. If it involves a patient please always quote the NHI NUMBER e.g. ABC1234.

See under "Other" for our team of nurses, podiatrists and dietitians.

Level 1, Building 4
Greenlane Clinical Centre
214 Greenlane Road
Epsom, Auckland

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Street Address

Level 1, Building 4
Greenlane Clinical Centre
214 Greenlane Road
Epsom, Auckland

Postal Address

Greenlane Clinical Centre
PO Box 92189
Victoria Street West
Auckland 1142

This page was last updated at 3:29PM on January 18, 2024. This information is reviewed and edited by Diabetes Centre | Auckland | Te Toka Tumai | Te Whatu Ora.